bickering

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bick·er

 (bĭk′ər)
intr.v. bick·ered, bick·er·ing, bick·ers
1. To engage in a bad-tempered quarrel, often in a petty manner over something trivial; squabble. See Synonyms at argue.
2.
a. To flicker or glitter: "bicker like a flame" (Robert Browning).
b. To move or flow with a rippling or gurgling sound.
n.
An angry quarrel; a squabble.

[Middle English bikeren, to attack.]

bick′er·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bickering - a quarrel about petty pointsbickering - a quarrel about petty points  
dustup, quarrel, run-in, wrangle, row, words - an angry dispute; "they had a quarrel"; "they had words"
Translations

bickering

[ˈbɪkərɪŋ] Nriñas fpl, discusiones fpl

bickering

[ˈbɪkərɪŋ] n
(political)querelles fpl
[neighbours, family] → chamailleries fpl

bickering

nGezänk nt

bickering

[ˈbɪkərɪŋ] nbisticci mpl
References in classic literature ?
Whether the God descend from above Or the man ascend upon high, Whether this maker of tents be Jove Or a younger deity-- I will be no judge between your gods And your godless bickerings, Lictor, drive them hence with rods-- I care for none of these things!
As we have, therefore, travelled together through so many pages, let us behave to one another like fellow-travellers in a stage coach, who have passed several days in the company of each other; and who, notwithstanding any bickerings or little animosities which may have occurred on the road, generally make all up at last, and mount, for the last time, into their vehicle with chearfulness and good humour; since after this one stage, it may possibly happen to us, as it commonly happens to them, never to meet more.
The hunting season over, all past tricks and maneuvres are forgotten, all feuds and bickerings buried in oblivion.
But there are many other sources, besides interfering claims of boundary, from which bickerings and animosities may spring up among the members of the Union.
She was also extremely jealous, and had a way of signifying disapproval of my methods that led to many coldnesses and even bickerings between us, which I now see to have been undignified.
When the room and books had been shown, with some bickerings between the brother and sister that I did my utmost to appease or mitigate, Mary Ann brought me her doll, and began to be very loquacious on the subject of its fine clothes, its bed, its chest of drawers, and other appurtenances; but Tom told her to hold her clamour, that Miss Grey might see his rocking-horse, which, with a most important bustle, he dragged forth from its corner into the middle of the room, loudly calling on me to attend to it.
But in Jane the milk of human kindness had not been curdled by years of matrimonial bickerings.