biculturalism


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bi·cul·tur·al

 (bī-kŭl′chər-əl)
adj.
Of or relating to two distinct cultures in one nation or geographic region: bicultural education.

bi·cul′tur·al·ism n.

biculturalism

(baɪˈkʌltʃərəlɪzəm)
n
(Peoples) the characteristics, or policy, of a two-cultured society

bi•cul•tur•al•ism

(baɪˈkʌl tʃər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
the presence of two different cultures in the same region.
[1950–55]
bi•cul′tur•al, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Volume 2, on culture and characteristic adaptations, addresses the cross-cultural generalizability of personality types and aspects of personality and adjustment associated with bilingualism and biculturalism.
Several possible positions are posited, before suggesting a stronger pedagogical understanding of the purposes of the concept of biculturalism would support ECE teachers to utilize their professional energies in more nuanced ways when teaching Te Reo Maori.
In turn, they try to counter these challenges by employing strategies of resisting stereotypes, proving their worth, adopting biculturalism, and seeking out kinship.
The authors acknowledge that emphasis on cultural competence is not universally valued; "many still appear to perceive bilingualism or biculturalism as un-American or a disadvantage or a detriment to U.
As youll recall, the concept at that time was biculturalism.
It is essential to understand the dynamics of biculturalism and its effect on consumer and shopper behavior to help maximize Hispanic marketing investments.
While Santiago uses memory to reproduce the trope of the Lush Land in the diasporic context, Ortiz Cofer self-reflexively acknowledges the failures of memory and from these fissures enables the emergence of a critique of the colonial condition that rejects utopie images of the past and instead attempts to negotiate cultural identity and national belonging by accepting biculturalism and bilingualism.
That is, to achieve multiculturalism, immigrants must adopt a philosophy of biculturalism, in which they are 'doubly engaged' in their heritage culture and the larger society (Berry 2013).
Our staff experiences biculturalism, a phenomenon that allows us to effectively live in two worlds, sometimes three.
6) that emerged on the ballet stage and in archival holdings, offer suggestions on how now to explore modalities of enhanced understanding that are better informed and reflective of practical biculturalism.
The learning outcomes for this essay centred on biculturalism, te reo Maori and the historical, political, social and cultural influences on New Zealand schools.