bicuspid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to bicuspid: bicuspid valve, Bicuspid teeth

bi·cus·pid

 (bī-kŭs′pĭd)
adj.
Having two points or cusps, as the crescent moon.
n.
A bicuspid tooth, especially a premolar.

[New Latin bicuspis, bicuspid- : Latin bi-, two; see bi-1 + Latin cuspis, sharp point.]

bicuspid

(baɪˈkʌspɪd) or

bicuspidate

adj
(Anatomy) having or terminating in two cusps or points
n
(Anatomy) a bicuspid tooth; premolar

bi•cus•pid

(baɪˈkʌs pɪd)

adj.
1. Also, bi•cus′pi•date`. having or terminating in two cusps or points, as certain teeth.
n.
[1830–40]

bi·cus·pid

(bī-kŭs′pĭd)
A tooth having two points or cusps, especially a premolar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bicuspid - a tooth having two cusps or pointsbicuspid - a tooth having two cusps or points; located between the incisors and the molars
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
Adj.1.bicuspid - having two cusps or points (especially a molar tooth)bicuspid - having two cusps or points (especially a molar tooth); "bicuspid teeth"; "bicuspid leaves"
angulate, angular - having angles or an angular shape
Translations

bicuspid

[baɪˈkʌspɪd]
A. ADJbicúspide
B. Nbicúspide m

bicuspid

adjmit zwei Spitzen, zweihöckrig, bikuspidal (spec)
n (Anat) → vorderer Backenzahn

bi·cus·pid

a. bicúspide, que presenta dos puntas.

bicuspid

adj & n bicúspide m
References in periodicals archive ?
Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman.
The purpose of this study is to generate a new regressive equation to predict the diameter of the cuspid and bicuspid teeth, through mesiodistal width of lower incisors in a Chilean population sample, differentiating between native and non-native population.
Other causes include damage to the heart valves due to diseases like rheumatic heart disease, or congenital heart defects like bicuspid aortic valve, misshapen tricuspid aortic valve, or a unicuspid valve.
Among specific topics are bicuspid aortic valve disease, pulmonary regurgitation and stenosis, percutaneous mitral valve procedures, valve surgery: endocarditis, computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiographic calculations and case examples.
SOV aneurysms have been associated with bicuspid aortic valves (Fig.
Various clinical presentations of AOS include oligohydramnios, cutis marmorata, upper limb micromelia and brachypodia, acrania, microcephaly, palatine or auricular malformations, intracranial calcifications, hydrocephaly, arhinencephaly, spina bifida, epilepsy, mental retardation, anatomic bronchial anomalies, renal abnormalities, and cardiovascular anomalies such as bicuspid aortic valve, atrial septal defect, Shone's complex, aortic valve stenosis, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tetralogy of Fallot, double outlet right ventricle, portal hypertension and pulmonary hypertension.
Bicuspid aortic valve is traditionally considered an innocuous congenital anomaly.
Frequency by decades of unicuspid, bicuspid, and tricuspid aortic valves in adults having isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, with or without associated aortic regurgitation.
A 78-year-old man with severe bicuspid aortic valve stenosis complicated by diffuse left ventricular mid-layer fibrosis, who had been consuming probiotics regularly, developed Lactobacillus paracasei endocarditis.
The risk of aortic stenosis rises not only with age but also in people with congenital defects, such as a bicuspid aortic valve (which has two leaflets instead of three), or those with scarring from rheumatic fever.
Three treatment options were considered: extraction of upper first bicuspids and lower left first and right second bicuspids, extraction of the lower first bicuspid with mandibular advancement surgery, and extraction of one lower incisor.
These include bicuspid aortic valves (two-leaf aortic valves instead of the normal three-leaf valves) and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.