bidder


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Related to bidder: Highest bidder

bid

 (bĭd)
v. bade (băd, bād) or bid, bid·den (bĭd′n) or bid, bid·ding, bids
v.tr.
1. past tense and past participle bid
a. To offer or propose (an amount) as a price.
b. To auction (a contract): The city will bid the project next summer.
c. To offer (someone) membership, as in a group or club: "glancing around to be sure that he had been bid by a society that he wanted" (Louis Auchincloss).
d. Games To state one's intention to take (tricks of a certain number or suit in cards): bid four hearts.
2. To utter (a greeting or salutation): I bid you farewell.
3. To issue a command to; direct: "Lee ... bid the captain sit beside him and report" (Stephen W. Sears).
4. To invite to attend; summon: The host bid the guests come to dinner.
v.intr. past tense and past participle bid
1. To make an offer to pay or accept a specified price: decided not to bid on the roll-top desk.
2. To seek to win or attain something; strive.
n.
1.
a. An offer to pay a certain amount of money for something: made a bid on the antique desk.
b. The amount offered or proposed: The highest bid at the auction was $5,000.
2. An invitation, especially one offering membership in a group or club.
3. An earnest effort to win or attain something: a team in a bid to win the championship; a candidate who made a bid for the presidency.
4. Games
a. The act of bidding in cards.
b. The number of tricks or points declared.
c. The trump or no-trump declared.
d. The turn of a player to bid.
Phrasal Verbs:
bid in
To outbid on one's own property at an auction in order to raise the final selling price.
bid out
To offer (work) for bids from outside contractors.
bid up
To cause (a price) to rise by increasing the amount bid: bid up the price of wheat.
Idioms:
bid defiance
To refuse to submit; offer resistance to.
bid fair
To appear likely.

[Middle English bidden, to ask, command (from Old English biddan; see gwhedh- in Indo-European roots) and Middle English beden, to offer, proclaim (from Old English bēodan; see bheudh- in Indo-European roots).]

bid′der n.

BID

abbr.
Bachelor of Industrial Design
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bidder - someone who makes an offerbidder - someone who makes an offer    
applicant, applier - a person who requests or seeks something such as assistance or employment or admission
2.bidder - someone who makes a bid at cardsbidder - someone who makes a bid at cards  
bridge player, hand - a card player in a game of bridge; "we need a 4th hand for bridge"
preemptor, pre-emptor - a bidder in bridge who makes a preemptive bid
Translations
مُحاوَله، دَعْوَه
dražitelnabízející
byder
ajánlattevõárverezõlicitáló
tilboîsgjafi; bjóîandi
teklif veren

bidder

[ˈbɪdəʳ] N
1. (at auction, Comm) → postor(a) m/f
the highest bidderel/la mejor postor(a)
2. (Cards) → declarante mf

bidder

[ˈbɪdər] n (at auction)enchérisseur m
the highest bidder → le plus offrant
the successful bidder → l'adjudicataire

bidder

nBietende(r) mf, → Steigerer m; to sell to the highest bidderan den Höchst- or Meistbietenden verkaufen; there were no biddersniemand hat geboten or ein Gebot gemacht

bidder

[ˈbɪdəʳ] nofferente m/f (Cards) → chi fa la dichiarazione
the highest bidder → il/la miglior offerente

bid

(bid) verb
1. past tense, past participle bid – to offer (an amount of money) at an auction. John bid ($1,000) for the painting.
2. (with for) – past tense, past participle bid – to state a price (for a contract). My firm is bidding for the contract for the new road.
3. past tense bade (bӕd) , past participle ˈbidden – to tell (someone) to (do something). He bade me enter.
4. past tense bade (bӕd) , past participle ˈbidden – to express a greeting etc (to someone). He bade me farewell.
noun
1. an offer of a price. a bid of $20.
2. an attempt (to obtain). a bid for freedom.
ˈbidder noun
ˈbidding noun
ˈbiddable adjective
obedient. a biddable child.
References in classic literature ?
They come and go," says he, "when and where they please; provide their own horses, arms, and other equipments; trap and trade on their own account, and dispose of their skins and peltries to the highest bidder.
My heart fell down amongst my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a warwhoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would a sold out for half price if there was a bidder.
He calls the rich men together, the highest bidder gets the speculation, pays the Pacha on the spot, and then sells out to smaller fry, who sell in turn to a piratical horde of still smaller fry.
The crowds were enormous to-day, for Carthoris, Prince of Helium, was to be the principal bidder.
Sir James Bidder would be there, and all the Cahills and the Fussells, and his sister-in-law, Mrs.
Wherefore, I am minded to put the Great Carbuncle on shipboard, and voyage with it to England, France, Spain, Italy, or into Heathendom, if Providence should send me thither, and, in a word, dispose of the gem to the best bidder among the potentates of the earth, that he may place it among his crown jewels.
His guns, horses, and carts were sold to the highest bidder.
Bowyer was a bidder, and this was too exasperating.
He sets his kingdom up to the best bidder, like some scullion farrier selling a glandered horse.
Now it was not the custom to show a slave to a private bidder, but as no one dared to disobey the vizir his request was granted.
Winkle began to dream that he was at a club, and that the members being very refractory, the chairman was obliged to hammer the table a good deal to preserve order; then he had a confused notion of an auction room where there were no bidders, and the auctioneer was buying everything in; and ultimately he began to think it just within the bounds of possibility that somebody might be knocking at the street door.