Big Bang


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Big Bang

n.
The beginning of space, time, matter, energy, and of the expansion of the universe according to the Big Bang theory.

big bang

n
1. any sudden forceful beginning or radical change
2. (Astronomy) (modifier) of or relating to the big-bang theory
3. (Banking & Finance) (sometimes capitals) the major modernization that took place on the London Stock Exchange on Oct 27 1986, after which the distinction between jobbers and brokers was abolished and operations became fully computerized

Big′ Bang′


n.
(sometimes l.c.) the cosmic explosion of matter postulated by the big bang theory.
[1950–55]

big bang

(bĭg)
The violent explosion of an extremely small, hot, and dense body of matter between 12 and 18 billion years ago. It is viewed as the earliest event in a widely held model of the origin of the universe. Compare steady state universe.
Did You Know? It's a chilling thought: In the 1920s, astronomers found that wherever they looked in space, distant galaxies were rapidly moving away from Earth. In other words, the universe was getting larger and larger. By calculating the speed of several galaxies and working back from there, astronomers learned that this expansion began between 12 and 18 billion years ago, when the entire universe was smaller than a dime and almost infinitely dense. According to the widely accepted theory of the big bang, a massive explosion kicked off the expansion and was the origin of space and time. Now scientists must figure out how much mass the universe contains in order to see what lies ahead. If there is enough mass, the gravity attracting all the pieces to each other will eventually stop the expansion and pull all the pieces of the universe back together in a "big crunch." The universe would then be a closed universe. However, there may not be enough mass to support a universe that is closed. If that is the case, then an open universe would expand forever, and all the galaxies and stars would drift away from each other and become dark and cold.

big bang

The day in 1986 when, in the course of one day, the London Stock Exchange was deregulated and new computing technology brought in.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
blowup, detonation, explosion - a violent release of energy caused by a chemical or nuclear reaction
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
He doesn't mean that in a simple way, however, because he doesn't imply that there was no matter or antimatter or dark matter before Big Bang.
G-Dragon is the second member of Big Bang to enlist in the military.
The ladies' Big Bang One-Click Sapphire 39mm and the Big Bang Unico Sapphire Galaxy 45mm have been inspired by the billions of stars in the galaxy.
The team won at the North West heats of The Big Bang Fair and will find out if they've been successful in the national final at The Big Bang Fair next year.
Sunderland-based RTC North has secured a contract to deliver the 2018 Big Bang Near Me programme in the North East, and a schedule of events is now being drawn up.
The Big Bang hiatus has been brought about by some urgent personal matters that some members have to attend to.
Celebrating its ninth year in 2017, The Big Bang Fair brings together the STEM community in a collective effort to inspire more than 70,000 young people, their teachers and parents across four days each March.
The Logitech Big Bang cases provide military class protection and are available in two colours - a sober grey and a flashy fluorescent yellow.
Big Bang Partners creates cutting-edge apps that while perhaps not transforming people's lives, they certainly make them more enjoyable and convenient
Exoplanets that orbit far beyond the habitable zone may have been able to support life in the distant past, warmed by the relic radiation left over from the Big Bang that created the universe 13.
A decade ago, spurred by a question for a fifth-grade science project, John Cramer devised an audio recreation of the Big Bang that started our universe nearly 14 billion years ago.
Paul Jackson, chief executive of Engineering UK, accepted the award on behalf of the Big Bang Fair at the Royal Academy's annual awards dinner, held at the Royal Opera House.