big-name


Also found in: Idioms.

big-name

(bĭg′nām′)
adj. Informal
1. Widely recognized or acclaimed; famous: a big-name performer; a big-name college.
2. Of or involving one that is widely recognized or acclaimed: big-name politics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Co-op was in there too, with big-name eggs on the shelves in Bristol.
COLIN MONTGOMERIE has taken a swipe at the big-name golf stars who are snubbing the Olympics this summer.
The Stromsgodset boss, who worked under Deila in Norway last season, has watched his big-name countrymen go to the UK and struggle as gaffers.
WBA super-bantamweight king Scott Quigg insists the big-name fights he craves are just around the corner.
However, I do not share Midlands Today presenter Nick Owen's assertion that viewers are alienating ITV's breakfast programmes because of how much their big-name presenters are said to be paid (Mail, April 22).
Summary: The Chancellor is to unveil a Au154 million blitz on big-name global companies.
Don't expect him to be lining up against a Coronation Street/ Hollyoaks XI soon, though, as the striker has plenty of big-name friends to help out.
PLUS EUROPA ACTION 46,47 Liverpool should have won more convincingly but big-name new signing Cole, sent off against Arsenal on Sunday and convicted of speeding onWednesday, missed a second-half penalty.
SUNDERLAND chairman Niall Quinn has promised to take his time to find a big-name manager after Ricky Sbragia kept the club in the Premier League and then stood down.
ALL BLACK Mils Muliaina has emerged as a big-name target for the Blues.
The one good thing is that Memphis will have salary-cap room at the end of this season and could attract a big-name player and a big-name coach.
But all good things come to those who wait, according to Friedman, who said big-name tenants will bring more long term security to the landlord, especially chains with corporate signatures, where corporations pay the lease on stores even if the store does not make a profit on that particular month.