bigamy

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Related to bigamists: bigamous

big·a·my

 (bĭg′ə-mē)
n.
The criminal offense of marrying one person while still legally married to another.

[Middle English bigamie, from Old French, from Medieval Latin bigamia, from Late Latin bigamus, twice married : Latin bi-, two; see bi-1 + Greek gamos, marriage; see -gamous.]

big′a·mist n.

bigamy

(ˈbɪɡəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Law) the crime of marrying a person while one is still legally married to someone else
[C13: via French from Medieval Latin bigamus; see bi-1, -gamy]
ˈbigamist n
ˈbigamous adj
ˈbigamously adv

big•a•my

(ˈbɪg ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
the act of marrying one person while still being legally married to another. Compare monogamy, polygamy (def. 1).
[1200–50; Middle English bigamie < Medieval Latin bigamia]

bigamy

the condition of having two spouses simultaneously. — bigamist, n. — bigamous, adj.
See also: Crime
the state or practice of being married to more than one wife or one husband at a time. — bigamist, n. — bigamous, adj.
See also: Marriage
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bigamy - having two spouses at the same timebigamy - having two spouses at the same time
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
marriage, matrimony, spousal relationship, wedlock, union - the state of being a married couple voluntarily joined for life (or until divorce); "a long and happy marriage"; "God bless this union"
2.bigamy - the offense of marrying someone while you have a living spouse from whom no valid divorce has occurredbigamy - the offense of marrying someone while you have a living spouse from whom no valid divorce has occurred
regulatory offence, regulatory offense, statutory offence, statutory offense - crimes created by statutes and not by common law
Translations
bigamie
bigami
bigámia
tvíkvæni
bigamiškasdvipatystėturinti du vyrusturintis dvi žmonas
bigāmija, divlaulība
bigamia
iki eşlilikiki karılı/kocalı olma

bigamy

[ˈbɪgəmɪ] Nbigamia f

bigamy

[ˈbɪgəmi] nbigamie fBig Apple n
the Big Apple → New York, la ville de New Yorkbig band
nbig band m
modif [music, sound] → de big band; [era] → des big bandsBig Bang n
the Big Bang → le big bangbig bang theory Big Bang theory nthéorie f du big bangbig business n
(= big companies) → les grandes entreprisesfplles grandes firmes fpl
to be big business (= profitable activity) → être un secteur lucratifbig cat n (lion, tiger)grand félin m, fauve mbig cheese ngros bonnet mbig city n
the big city (as place of opportunity)la grande villebig deal
n
(= important thing) → grosse affaire f
it's no big deal (= not difficult) → ce n'est pas la mer à boire
to make a big deal of sth → faire toute une affaire de qch
excl (= so what) → et après!big dipper nmontagnes fpl russesbig end n [car] → tête f de biellebig fish n (= important person) → gros poisson mbig game ngros gibier m

bigamy

nBigamie f

bigamy

[ˈbɪgəmɪ] nbigamia

bigamy

(ˈbigəmi) noun
marriage to two wives or two husbands at once (a crime in some countries). He's been charged with committing bigamy.
ˈbigamist noun
ˈbigamous adjective
References in classic literature ?
This jail was a Noah's ark of the city's crime--there were murderers, "hold-up men" and burglars, embezzlers, counterfeiters and forgers, bigamists, "shoplifters," "confidence men," petty thieves and pickpockets, gamblers and procurers, brawlers, beggars, tramps and drunkards; they were black and white, old and young, Americans and natives of every nation under the sun.
Then this so sweet maid is a polyandrist, and me, with my poor wife dead to me, but alive by Church's law, though no wits, all gone, even I, who am faithful husband to this now-no-wife, am bigamist.
There is no knight-errant to come and seek a quarrel with me on account of the fair lady I detain a prisoner; but I have judges quite ready who will quickly dispose of a woman so shameless as to glide, a bigamist, into the bed of Lord de Winter, my brother.
Squire Hawker played both the bigamist and the bandit.
It led me to build up a picture of what was happening in practice and some of the most surprising findings relate to the average duration of the marriages in mid-Victorian England - well over 30 years - the speed with which bigamy was detected and the propensity of divorcees as well as bigamists to lie about their marital status when remarrying
TWELVE people became bigamists overnight after a High Court judge yesterday overturned 180 divorces obtained in a PS500,000 scam.