bigot


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Related to bigot: bigotry

big·ot

 (bĭg′ət)
n.
One who is strongly partial to one's own group, religion, race, or politics and is intolerant of those who differ.

[French, excessively religious person, religiously intolerant person, from Old French, Norman person, excessively religious person, of unknown origin.]
Word History: The ultimate origin of the word bigot is unknown. When bigot first appears in Old French, it is as an insulting term for a Norman. A colorful story is often told about the origin of the term with Rollo, the pagan Viking conqueror who received Normandy as a fief from Charles III of France in 911. Rollo converted to Christianity for the occasion, but it is said that he refused to complete his oath of fealty to the king by kissing the king's feet and said Ne se bi got, "Never, by God!" in a mishmash of Old French and a Germanic language. This bi got then became a term of abuse for the Normans. This story is certainly false, but some scholars have proposed that Old French bigot did indeed originate as a reference to be Gode!—the Old and early Middle English equivalent of Modern English by God!, perhaps as a phrase that some Normans picked up in their English possessions in England and then used back in France. Later, in the 1400s, the French word bigot appears as a term of abuse for a person who is excessively religious. It is not clear, however, that this word bigot, "excessively religious person," is in fact the direct descendant of the Old French slur that was applied to the Normans. Rather, this bigot may come directly from Middle English bi God, "by God," or an equivalent phrase in one of the Germanic relatives of English such as German bei Gott or Dutch bij God. But even this is uncertain. In any case, English borrowed bigot from French with the sense "religious hypocrite" in the early 17th century. In English, the term also came to be applied to persons who hold stubbornly to any system of beliefs, and by extension, persons who are intolerant of those that differ from them in any way.

bigot

(ˈbɪɡət)
n
a person who is intolerant of any ideas other than his or her own, esp on religion, politics, or race
[C16: from Old French: name applied contemptuously to the Normans by the French, of obscure origin]
ˈbigoted adj

big•ot

(ˈbɪg ət)

n.
a person who is extremely intolerant of another's creed, belief, or opinion.
[1590–1600; < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bigot - a prejudiced person who is intolerant of any opinions differing from his own
chauvinist - a person with a prejudiced belief in the superiority of his or her own kind
antifeminist - someone who does not believe in the social or economic or political equality of men and women
homophobe - a person who hates or fears homosexual people
drumbeater, partisan, zealot - a fervent and even militant proponent of something
racialist, racist - a person with a prejudiced belief that one race is superior to others
sectarian, sectarist, sectary - a member of a sect; "most sectarians are intolerant of the views of any other sect"
segregationist, segregator - someone who believes the races should be kept apart

bigot

noun fanatic, racist, extremist, sectarian, maniac, fiend (informal), zealot, persecutor, dogmatist a narrow-minded bigot with pretensions to power
Quotations
"There is nothing more dangerous than the conscience of a bigot" [George Bernard Shaw]
Translations
مُتَعَصِّب لِرأْي أو لِعَقيدَه
fanatikpobožnůstkář
vakbuzgó
òröngsÿnismaîur
fanatikasfanatiškasfanatiškumas
fanātiķis
pobožnôstkár
pobožnjakar
bağnaz kimseyobaz

bigot

[ˈbɪgət] Nintolerante mf

bigot

[ˈbɪgət] n
(religious)fanatique mf, sectaire mf
(= racist) → fanatique mf

bigot

nEiferer m; (Rel also) → bigotter Mensch

bigot

[ˈbɪgət] n (pej) → fazioso/a

bigot

(ˈbigət) noun
a person who constantly and stubbornly holds a particular point of view etc. a religious bigot.
ˈbigoted adjective
ˈbigotry noun
bigoted attitude or behaviour.
References in classic literature ?
spite of million villains, this makes me a bigot in the fadeless fidelity of man
I did not believe a word of this, but rather than have trouble I let it go; for it is a waste of breath to argue with a bigot.
De Bigot,'' he added to his seneschal, ``thou wilt word this our second summons so courteously, as to gratify the pride of these Saxons, and make it impossible for them again to refuse; although, by the bones of Becket, courtesy to them is casting pearls before swine.
I know nothing of the arcana of the Roman Catholic religion, and I am not a bigot in matters of theology, but I suspect the root of this precocious impurity, so obvious, so general in Popish countries, is to be found in the discipline, if not the doctrines of the Church of Rome.
Without electricity the air would rot, and without this violence of direction which men and women have, without a spice of bigot and fanatic, no excitement, no efficiency.
An imbecile bigot," said des Lupeaulx, "and as utterly incapable as--"
If an angry bigot assumes this bountiful cause of Abolition, and comes to me with his last news from Barbadoes, why should I not say to him, 'Go love thy infant; love thy wood-chopper; be good-natured and modest; have that grace; and never varnish your hard, uncharitable ambition with this incredible tenderness for black folk a thousand miles off.
Even his beauty, however, and his winning manners, sometimes produced an effect ultimately unfavorable; for the bigots, when the outer surfaces of their iron hearts had been softened and again grew hard, affirmed that no merely natural cause could have so worked upon them.
The bigots of the day hinted that it would be no matter of surprise if an evil spirit were allowed to enter this beautiful form, and seduce the carver to destruction.
Choked in weeds; Christians, bigots,--why, Rachel herself, would be a slave with a fan to sing songs to men when they felt drowsy.
The men and women who live and move in that new world of his creation are as varied as life itself; they are kings and beggars, saints and lovers, great captains, poets, painters, musicians, priests and Popes, Jews, gipsies and dervishes, street-girls, princesses, dancers with the wicked [44] witchery of the daughter of Herodias, wives with the devotion of the wife of Brutus, joyous girls and malevolent grey-beards, statesmen, cavaliers, soldiers of humanity, tyrants and bigots, ancient sages and modern spiritualists, heretics, scholars, scoundrels, devotees, rabbis, persons of quality and men of low estate--men and women as multiform as nature or society has made them.
We may think of one another now as dangerous fanatics or narrow bigots, with whom no truce is possible, from whom we shall only sever more and more to the end of our lives, whom it would be our respective duties to imprison or hang, if we had the power.