biliteral

biliteral

(ˌbaɪˈlɪtərəl)
adj
consisting of two letters
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the prisoner's constraint to divide the letters in the palindrome into A and B forms (short letters (aceimnorsuvwxz) are A form, tall letters (bdfghjklpqty) are B form), the palindrome converts to baaab aabaa aabaa baaab in Bacon's biliteral cipher:
En segundo lugar, y derivado de lo anterior, porque es preciso interpretar que regionalismo y estrategia biliteral son dos posibilidades que estan lejos de ser excluyentes entre si.
Moreover, Brazilian ratification of nuclear safeguards with the International Atomic Energy Agency boosted the confidence between the two nations, therefore, the then US Secretary of Defense William Perry called for closer biliteral cooperation between the two countries in the aerospace industry during his visit to Brazil in November, 1994.
In conclusion we can say that immediately after the Cold War period, under the leadership of Cardoso Brazil made bright prospectus for the future development of much improved biliteral relationship between the US and Brazil with the assumption that no radical change in either country would call in to question the political and economic realities on which relationship was based.
These nouns have also usually been excluded from past treatments of reduplicated nominal patterns and subsumed under other rubrics, such as noun formations from biliteral roots (e.
One fascinating example is a large heterodox analysis of Hebrew, occasional pushing beyond biliteral roots towards uniliteral roots, by Fabre-d,Olivet, (22) which much impressed a young Benjamin Whorf, (23) who in turn influenced modern general linguistics in powerful (although also heterodox) ways.
Macdonald ("New Thoughts on a Biliteral Origin for the Semitic Verb," Annual of the Leeds University Oriental Society 5 [1963-1965]: 63-85) and Christopher Ehret ("The Origins of the Third Consonants in Semitic Roots," Journal of Afroasiatic Languages 1 [1989]: 109-202).
Yet the use of many biliteral signs and groups to represent only their first consonant, which eventually became standard practice in Demotic (Vittman 1996: 446), seems not to have been standard in Late Egyptian.