billy


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bil·ly 1

 (bĭl′ē)
n. pl. bil·lies
A billy club.

bil·ly 2

 (bĭl′ē)
n. pl. bil·lies Australian
A metal pot or kettle used in camp cooking.

[Probably short for billypot, from Billy, nickname for William.]

billy

(ˈbɪlɪ)
n, pl -lies
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) US and Canadian a wooden club esp a police officer's truncheon
[C19: special use of the name Billy, pet form of William]

billy

(ˈbɪlɪ) or

billycan

n, pl -lies or -lycans
1. a metal can or pot for boiling water, etc, over a campfire
2. Austral and NZ (as modifier): billy-tea.
3. informal Austral and NZ to make tea
[C19: from Scot billypot cooking vessel]

bil•ly

(ˈbɪl i)

n., pl. -lies.
1. Also called bil′ly club`. a heavy stick used as a weapon, esp. by the police.
2. Also called bil′ly•can` (-ˌkæn) Australian. a pot or kettle for cooking over a campfire.
[1845–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.billy - a short stout club used primarily by policemenbilly - a short stout club used primarily by policemen
club - stout stick that is larger at one end; "he carried a club in self defense"; "he felt as if he had been hit with a club"
2.billy - male goatbilly - male goat        
caprine animal, goat - any of numerous agile ruminants related to sheep but having a beard and straight horns
Translations

billy

[ˈbɪlɪ] N (US) (also billy club) → porra f

billy

n (also billycan)Kochgeschirr nt
References in classic literature ?
Here, no doubt, statistics of the former commerce of Salem might be discovered, and memorials of her princely merchants -- old King Derby -- old Billy Gray -- old Simon Forrester -- and many another magnate in his day, whose powdered head, however, was scarcely in the tomb before his mountain pile of wealth began to dwindle.
You ask the portier at what hours the trains leave--he tells you instantly; or you ask him who is the best physician in town; or what is the hack tariff; or how many children the mayor has; or what days the galleries are open, and whether a permit is required, and where you are to get it, and what you must pay for it; or when the theaters open and close, what the plays are to be, and the price of seats; or what is the newest thing in hats; or how the bills of mortality average; or "who struck Billy Patterson.
en de ole watchman, Billy Hatch, he 'uz a-noddin' on de companionway;--en I knowed 'em all; en, lan', but dey did look good
By the time Ben was fagged out, Tom had traded the next chance to Billy Fisher for a kite, in good repair; and when he played out, Johnny Miller bought in for a dead rat and a string to swing it with -- and so on, and so on, hour after hour.
Black Dog as ever was, come for to see his old shipmate Billy, at the Admiral Benbow inn.
The gun-bullocks lay down together and began chewing the cud, but the young mule huddled close to Billy.
I'll send no man away because he's stupid: if Billy Taft, the idiot, wanted to learn anything, I'd not refuse to teach him.
Mayhap you may be thinking too that the Royal Billy isn’t so good a ship as the Billy de Paris; but she would have licked two of her any day, and in all weathers.
With him, also, came his great favorite and confidential counseller, Kraimaker; who, from holding a post equivalent to that of prime minister, had been familiarly named Billy Pitt by the British visitors to the islands.
Five years from now, or so on, maybe, you'll be lookin' over your first year's accounts, and, knowin' what you'll know then, you'll say: 'Well, Billy Beartup'--or Old Cloke as it might be--'did me proper when I was new.
When, a year later, Billy was born, she was swept up to that dizzy crest of rapture which, to finely attuned souls, is the recompense and justification of all their valleys.
the din of all the great double petards of the Saint-Jean, the discharge of twenty arquebuses on supports, the detonation of that famous serpentine of the Tower of Billy, which, during the siege of Paris, on Sunday, the twenty-sixth of September, 1465, killed seven Burgundians at one blow, the explosion of all the powder stored at the gate of the Temple, would have rent his ears less rudely at that solemn and dramatic moment, than these few words, which fell from the lips of the usher, "His eminence, Monseigneur the Cardinal de Bourbon.