bilocation


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bi·lo·ca·tion

 (bī′lō-kā′shən)
n.
Existence or the ability to exist simultaneously in two places.

bilocation

(ˌbaɪləʊˈkeɪʃən)
n
the existence of something in two places at the same time

bi•lo•ca•tion

(ˌbaɪ loʊˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
the state of being or the ability to be in two places at the same time.
[1855–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bilocation - the ability (said of certain Roman Catholic saints) to exist simultaneously in two locations
location - a point or extent in space
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
This attribute gives human beings a vast array of paranormal possibilities: bilocation, divination, metamorphosis, etc" (Zahan 19).
Likewise, on the Jagiellonian Globe, the different scales of longitude running eastward and westward result in a very obvious bilocation of America in the eastern and western hemispheres: in the western hemisphere it lies according to the Columban longitudes, on an Earth equivalent to 30,191 kilometres in circumference, to the west of Africa, where it is called MUNDUSNOVUS, TERRA SANCTAE CRUCIS and TERRA DEBRAZIL; and in the eastern hemisphere it lies according to the Ptolemy-Behaim longitudes, on an Earth of equivalent to 33,296 kilometres in circumference, to the east of Africa &s AMERICA NOVITERREPERTA.
McCoy, the master of everything except bilocation, can only ride two of them, but he will settle for his two Champion Hurdle bullets staying on course.
Chaos ensues, including mystical visions, out-of-body mayhem, bilocation, lucid dreaming, and mysterious automatic writings.
29); bilocation, where one is believed to "be in more than one place at the same time" (p.
The various apparitions and supernatural phenomena she describes, such as bilocation, luminosity, levitation, odour of sanctity, and the stigmata, while not necessary articles of faith for Catholics, often serve to enhance one's belief.
Ambrose thus does not limit bilocation to saints with already established cults, but applies it simply to the dead, by virtue of the fact of their deaths.
The idea of bilocation is foregrounded on the dust jacket and throughout Against the Day; its "psychological prominence" is ensured for readers who, at a small cost, acquire their own small slab of doubly-refractive Iceland spar (Emmott 206).
And Lundberg is not alone in taking affective discharge, experiential space, and bilocation as the mechanics of weird.
82) Boyer recounts eleven years of major abstinence of food, save the Eucharist, hierognosis (discerning holy things), ecstatic visions, communion without deglutition, miraculous weight and rigidity, speaking in foreign tongues and bilocation.
Bilocation strikes me as too rarely reported to warrant inclusion in theorizing, unlike apparitions, which are too ubiquitous to be ignored.
Born in 1726, he was reputed to have been blessed with the skill of bilocation ( the ability to be in two places at once.