bimetallism

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bi·met·al·lism

 (bī-mĕt′l-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. The use of a monetary standard consisting of two metals, especially gold and silver, in a fixed ratio of value.
2. The doctrine advocating bimetallism.

bi·met′al·list n.
bi·met′al·lis′tic adj.

bimetallism

(baɪˈmɛtəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Banking & Finance) the use of two metals, esp gold and silver, in fixed relative values as the standard of value and currency
2. (Banking & Finance) the economic policies or doctrine supporting a bimetallic standard
biˈmetallist n

bi•met•al•lism

(baɪˈmɛt lˌɪz əm)

n.
1. the use of two metals, ordinarily gold and silver, at a fixed relative value, as the monetary standard.
2. the doctrine or policies supporting such a standard.
[1875–80]
bi•met′al•list, n.
bi•met`al•lis′tic, adj.

bimetallism

the use of two metals jointly as a monetary Standard with fixed values in relation to one another. — bimetallist, n. — bimetallistic, adj.
See also: Money
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bimetallism - a monetary standard under which the basic unit of currency is defined by stated amounts of two metals (usually gold and silver) with values set at a predetermined ratiobimetallism - a monetary standard under which the basic unit of currency is defined by stated amounts of two metals (usually gold and silver) with values set at a predetermined ratio
monetary standard, standard - the value behind the money in a monetary system
Translations
References in classic literature ?
At luncheon I saw by the glare in his eye that he was going to propose again, and I just managed to check him in time by assuring him that I was a bimetallist.
He dug deep into some of the forgotten dystopian fiction of eccentric populists and bimetallists like Ignatius Donnelly and Coin Harvey, finding a trove of conspiratorial thinking and anti-Semitism.
Fisher presented his work that way in response to attacks on the quantity theory by American economists who derided the quantity theory as an irrefutable tautology (notably Francis Amasa Walker of MIT) or as an empirically refuted theory that gave aid and comfort to soft-money bimetallists (the view taken by such hard money, gold standard stalwarts as J.