binarism

bi·na·rism

 (bī′nə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The analysis of complex objects or systems in terms of binary oppositions, especially in a facile or simplistic way.
2. A dichotomy.

bi′na·rist adj. & n.

binarism

(ˈbaɪnərɪzəm)
n
the state of being binary
References in periodicals archive ?
False/true, the most important binarism of realist fiction, is out of the question, as not only the authentication but also the falsification proves to be a falsity.
It does so without rancour but with a serious commitment to both deconstruction and reconstruction, in line with Tiffin's view that good postcolonial practice works by "refusing, realigning, deconstructing the 'master narrative' of western history [while] recapturing notions of self from 'other' and investigating that destructive binarism itself" (Tiffin 1988: 179).
Indeed, her refusal to leave Italy and her insistence on solving the mystery marks her as complicitous with Laura, and thus transgresses a simplistic good/bad or even virgin / whore binarism.
heterosexual and homosexual identities and, implicitly, the primacy of heteronormativity, might pose less of a threat to critics like Siegel--as opposed to those in "queer theory" that might seek to challenge the hetero/homo binarism and the stability of identity itself and to render that which is "familiar," "normal," or "natural" thoroughly strange, ab-normal, and un-natural.
Thus, in Halden's reading, the ultimate category in crisis is the binarism "fertile/barren.
If in Sula Morrison's theoretical project is to deconstruct binarism, and her political subject is African Americans in relation to war and civil rights, then the nexus of biblical allusion is the primary component of her language and specifically replicates the history and spirituality of the African American cultural experience.
In performing this alphabetic sleight of hand, "Omar-turned-Oscar" is exploiting the complex racial hierarchy of South African apartheid, a strategy that escapes the type of binarism found so often in postcolonial novels and, occasionally, in their readings.
Hall's diction ("[m]oral darkness," "profane" voices, "Pandaemonian riots," "hellish deed") suggests a rigid moral binarism that legitimates his act of social authority; as righteous stroller in his "heavenly retreat," he appropriates the moral right to intervene in the fracas.
Lionel's or the narrator's image of her as the spider both controlling and condemning her children for sin connects to Freud's discussion in "Femininity" of the aggressivity of the female spider, an image used to deconstruct the binarism of female passivity and male aggressivity and to suggest an alternate figure of the phallic mother (Standard Edition 22:115).
In an early footnote she even leaps into contemporary discourse to chastise Camille Paglia's sexual binarism of man as culture and woman as nature as "both simplistic and ahistorical" [24], and later identifies this very binarism as a "conventional Renaissance construction of gender" [37].
It is probably premature to consider Butler's Gender Trouble (1990) as the common wisdom in literary feminism, but Retallack's argument is that Butler's widely influential subversion of both gender categories and their subversive confusions is ultimately a reinforcement of gender binarism.