binarism

bi·na·rism

 (bī′nə-rĭz′əm)
n.
1. The analysis of complex objects or systems in terms of binary oppositions, especially in a facile or simplistic way.
2. A dichotomy.

bi′na·rist adj. & n.

binarism

(ˈbaɪnərɪzəm)
n
the state of being binary
References in periodicals archive ?
Always the entrepreneur, Mookie negotiates this binarism which, as Johnson demonstrates, would construe "blackness" and "success" as mutually exclusive properties.
This is so because of Arnold's - and other Victorians' - misconception of the problematics of selfhood in terms of a simple binarism, of inner self versus outer self.
That binarism is not natural but rather is naturalized, its character constructed and violent.
We must not allow Sokal to force upon us his banal version of the binarism of science (as the ready reference of external reality) and literary studies (as the hocus-pocus of cultural hermeneutics), not because we literary and cultural analysts are so fragile in our knowledge, but because his confreres, the most thoughtful members of the scientific community itself, will not have it either.
that the multiplicity Chen so incisively evokes can actually be produced, free of binarism.
Postmodern imploded binarism, in which the Other becomes the Same and the Same the Other, clarifies the collapse of sexuality on both large and small scales in King Lear.
It is particularly galling, if not surprising, that binarism is the target of his critique since Naipaul's "defenders" are homogenized and essentialized, so that differences among them evaporate, a case of the pot calling the kettle black.
I would take polite issue with this choice, since by opting for a director who in the West embodies a spirit of contrariness in Soviet cinema, we may be reinstating the very binarism of dogma that this book wishes to sidestep.
Briefly, the reliance of the so-called "politics of difference" (such as many versions of postcolonial critique) on assumptions regarding the strict binarism of hierarchical power structures (racism, sexism, etc.
Carol Cook's Irigaray-based reading argues, for example, that in gesturing beyond its own binarism Antony and Cleopatra demonstrates the absent excess associated with Cleopatra and woman; in the next essay, Linda Charnes effectively denies the move outside history that informs Cook's essay as much as the "liberal humanist critic's (LHC)" reading of transcendent Love (Charnes's stated target, 272) by challenging readings which attempt to find an alternative world exempt from the expansionist rhetoric of both Caesar and Cleopatra.
The "fisher-king" section of The Lion and the Fox culminates in explicit praise for Shakespeare's "ancient animal cunning" in invisibly staging the execution of the high, thus channeling social violence into the controlled model of binarism - the struggle of the "individual" against generalized decay - with its attendant emptying out through catharsis of any further desire to act.
My answer to these questions is a resounding "all of the above," and I base this answer upon the text's collapsing of the artist/subject or creator/creature binarism.