binder


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bind·er

 (bīn′dər)
n.
1. One that binds, especially a bookbinder.
2. Something, such as a cord, used to bind.
3. A notebook cover with rings or clamps for holding sheets of paper.
4. Something, such as the latex in certain paints, that creates uniform consistency, solidification, or cohesion.
5.
a. A machine that reaps and ties grain.
b. An attachment on a reaping machine that ties grain in bundles.
6. Law
a. A payment or written statement making an agreement legally binding until the completion of a formal insurance contract.
b. An agreement specifying the terms and conditions of a real estate transaction.
7. Ecology A plant, such as a ground cover, whose growth retards erosion.

binder

(ˈbaɪndə)
n
1. a firm cover or folder with rings or clasps for holding loose sheets of paper together
2. a material used to bind separate particles together, give an appropriate consistency, or facilitate adhesion to a surface
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding)
a. a person who binds books; bookbinder
b. a machine that is used to bind books
4. something used to fasten or tie, such as rope or twine
5. informal NZ a square meal
6. (Agriculture) obsolete Also called: reaper binder a machine for cutting grain and binding it into bundles or sheaves. Compare combine harvester
7. (Insurance) an informal agreement giving insurance coverage pending formal issue of a policy
8. (Architecture) a tie, beam, or girder, used to support floor joists
9. (Building) a stone for binding masonry; bondstone
10. (Chemistry) the nonvolatile component of the organic media in which pigments are dispersed in paint
11. (Linguistics) (in systemic grammar) a word that introduces a bound clause; a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun. Compare linker2

bind•er

(ˈbaɪn dər)

n.
1. a person or thing that binds.
2. a detachable cover, resembling the cover of a notebook or book, with clasps or rings for holding loose papers together: a three-ring binder.
3. a bookbinder.
4. an agreement granting coverage pending the issuance of an insurance policy.
5.
a. a sum of money given as a pledge of intent to purchase a piece of property.
b. a written receipt acknowledging this payment and granting the right to purchase the property.
6. any substance that causes the components of a mixture to cohere.
7. a vehicle in which the pigment of a paint is suspended.
[before 1000]

Binder

An implement to cut grain stalks and tie them in bundles. Row binders were for crops such as corn that were planted in rows. Small-grain binders were for crops such as wheat that were not planted in widely separated rows.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Binder - a machine that cuts grain and binds it in sheavesbinder - a machine that cuts grain and binds it in sheaves
harvester, reaper - farm machine that gathers a food crop from the fields
2.Binder - something used to bind separate particles together or facilitate adhesion to a surfacebinder - something used to bind separate particles together or facilitate adhesion to a surface
adhesive, adhesive agent, adhesive material - a substance that unites or bonds surfaces together
3.Binder - holds loose papers or magazinesbinder - holds loose papers or magazines  
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
4.Binder - something used to tie or bindbinder - something used to tie or bind  
ligament - any connection or unifying bond
Translations
binder

binder

[ˈbaɪndəʳ] N
1. (= file) → carpeta f
2. (Agr) → agavilladora f
3. [of book] → encuadernador(a) m/f

binder

[ˈbaɪndər] n (= file) → classeur m

binder

n
(Agr: = machine) → (Mäh)binder m, → Bindemäher m; (= person)(Garben)binder(in) m(f)
(Typ: = person) → Buchbinder(in) m(f); (= machine)Bindemaschine f
(for papers) → Hefter m; (for magazines also) → Mappe f

binder

[ˈbaɪndəʳ] n
a. (file) → classificatore m
b. (Agr) → mietilegatrice f
References in classic literature ?
Suppose that Marija could get a job in the big mill where they made binder twine--then they would move into this neighborhood, and he would really have a chance.
In the hot, blazing sun, he could shock wheat behind Martin, who sat on the binder and cut the beautiful swaying gold.
Swathe after swathe fell to the ground in a straight line behind them, and the binders bound them in bands of twisted straw.
The reaping-machine left the fallen corn behind it in little heaps, each heap being of the quantity for a sheaf; and upon these the active binders in the rear laid their hands--mainly women, but some of them men in print shirts, and trousers supported round their waists by leather straps, rendering useless the two buttons behind, which twinkled and bristled with sunbeams at every movement of each wearer, as if they were a pair of eyes in the small of his back.
But those of the other sex were the most interesting of this company of binders, by reason of the charm which is acquired by woman when she becomes part and parcel of outdoor nature, and is not merely an object set down therein as at ordinary times.
This report assists hopeful market entrants by establishing a detailed picture of the Chinese mycotoxin binder industry.
Companies engaged in the development and marketing of feed binder portfolio comprising lignin, clay, gelatin, carrageenan, and guar & locust bean gum can avail a concrete view about the market structure in key countries.
The basic concept behind the new technology was already known: modifying classic binders with silanes noticeably improves the binder properties.
Asphalt Concrete 6mm Dense Surface Course 100/150 binder content High stone.
gDoc Binder looks and behaves just like a physical ring-binder but offers many more advantages.
At the same time, Denison Industries reduced the costs associated with binder material and reworked castings and lowered the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced in its nobake operations.