bioaccumulate

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bioaccumulate

(ˌbaɪəʊəˈkjuːmʊˌleɪt)
vb (intr)
(Biology) (of substances, esp toxins) to build up within the tissues of organisms
ˌbioacˌcumuˈlation n
Translations
bioakkumulieren
생물농축되다
References in periodicals archive ?
Green Seal also recognized PathoClean does not contain reproductive toxins, volatile organic compounds, 2-butoxyethanol, alkylphenol ethoxylates, phthalates, and ozone-depleting compounds that contribute to the production of photochemical smog, tropospheric ozone, or poor indoor air quality; and that it is biodegradable, non-toxic to aquatic life, and non-combustible, with no bioaccumulating compounds.
Are they bioaccumulating in larger creatures potentially causing unexpected problems?
6) If similar immunomodulatory effects occur in humans, we may not be recognizing the impact these bioaccumulating compounds have on the overall burden of disease, particularly in groups with higher exposures, Germolec says.
managing persisting bioaccumulating pollutants: toxic minerals, biocides, hormone mimics, solvents, and chemical disruptors.
Determination of potentially Bioaccumulating complex mixtures of organochlorine compounds in waste water.
The research demonstrates that so-called halogenated organic compounds are also produced naturally and "were bioaccumulating in marine mammals--just as PCBs do now--before Monsanto, Dupont, and 3M were making halogenated organic compounds for industrial use," said Emma Teuten and Chris Reddy.
An ongoing investigation of mercury occurrence in this watershed has found that the mercury from the fill material has been redistributing across the fluvial deposition system and has been bioaccumulating in various trophic levels of the freshwater ecosystem.
Mercury emitted by power plants and other sources finds its way into the food chain by bioaccumulating in fish tissues.
When birds swallow these fish, toxins are passed on to their tissues, thus bioaccumulating up the food chain.
They ignore a range of other environmental impacts that have been shown to increase with affluence, including bioaccumulating toxic and hazardous wastes, the loss of biodiversity/habitat, and atmospheric pollution.
Humans are also at risk since, unlike the Antarctic minke whale, meat from Japanese coastal dolphins contains extremely high levels of bioaccumulating toxins such as heavy metals and organochlorines.
In this way, a predator can actually end up bioaccumulating - storing in its flesh - a larger quantity of toxin over a period of time than would constitute a single fatal dose.