bioaccumulate

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bioaccumulate

(ˌbaɪəʊəˈkjuːmʊˌleɪt)
vb (intr)
(Biology) (of substances, esp toxins) to build up within the tissues of organisms
ˌbioacˌcumuˈlation n
Translations
bioakkumulieren
생물농축되다
References in periodicals archive ?
maculiventris is capable of retaining, bioaccumulating, and possibly biomagnifying dietary Se, as shown when the food source was T.
Tenders are invited for Requires laboratory analytical services to perform analyses of biological (fish) tissues and/or surficial aquatic sediment samples for selected metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, selected pesticides, and other bioaccumulating chemicals of concern for the department of environmental management, office of water quality.
Persistent bioaccumulating pollutants are of top concern from the standpoint of food chain contamination (Frazzoli et al.
Are they bioaccumulating in larger creatures potentially causing unexpected problems?
6) If similar immunomodulatory effects occur in humans, we may not be recognizing the impact these bioaccumulating compounds have on the overall burden of disease, particularly in groups with higher exposures, Germolec says.
managing persisting bioaccumulating pollutants: toxic minerals, biocides, hormone mimics, solvents, and chemical disruptors.
The research demonstrates that so-called halogenated organic compounds are also produced naturally and "were bioaccumulating in marine mammals--just as PCBs do now--before Monsanto, Dupont, and 3M were making halogenated organic compounds for industrial use," said Emma Teuten and Chris Reddy.
One of the most controversial points of the compromise is the fact that only persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic substances (PBTs) and very persistent, very bioaccumulating and very toxic substances (vPvBs) would be subject to the automatic substitution requirement which, according to the Greens, is unacceptable.
Anthropogenic xenobiotics, especially the bioaccumulating and bioconcentrating toxic minerals (TMs) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), are the focus of this article as they are, in their more toxic forms, largely anthropogenic, human-sourced intoxicants.
By contrast, it does not fundamentally resolve the problem of cadmium, a carcinogenic, biotoxic and bioaccumulating substance found in many batteries.
When birds swallow these fish, toxins are passed on to their tissues, thus bioaccumulating up the food chain.
Why should we accept an increasing load of persistent, bioaccumulating chemicals in our bodies and in the environment, merely because no current test system has proved them to have adverse effects?