biological control


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biological control

n.
Control of a usually nonindigenous pest by introducing an organism that is a predator, parasite, or pathogen of the pest species in its native environment. Also called biocontrol.

biological control

n
(Biology) the control of destructive organisms by the use of other organisms, such as the natural predators of the pests

biolog′ical control′


n.
the control of pests by interference with their ecological status, as by introducing a natural enemy or a pathogen into the environment. Also called biocontrol.
[1920–25]

biological control

Controlling pests by biological not chemical means, as by introducing predators or, as with flies, sterilizing males.
References in periodicals archive ?
But for plums, the extent of the natural flora's potential for biological control of fruit decay remains largely unknown.
maculata has demonstrated that the species has good probability for success as a commercially raised augmentative biological control agent (Lucas et al.
One of integrated pest management measures is biological control which is among the most efficient and saving methods.
Biological control is an endeavor fraught with difficulty, requiring much research, attention to detail and knowledge of local ecological parameters and the way they interact with one another.
Four insect species were approved for release as biological control agents.
Biological control is a well-established field of applied ecology in which pest species are managed through the use of predators, parasites, pathogens, herbivores, or other natural mechanisms.
We are the first in our industry to offer farmers a truly comprehensive range of integrated crop solutions based on seeds, traits and combined chemical crop protection and biological control," she adds.
Biological control of pests and insects is also a part of the programme.
Encouragingly, many California citrus growers have incorporated biological control (biocontrol) -- the use of predaceous, parasitic or pathogenic organisms -- into their IPM programs.
Typically, these biological control agents are insects that severely damage or kill the weed, leave useful plants alone, and restore the ecological balance between the weed and its environment," explains Walker Jones, who, in April 2010, completed a 5-year assignment as director of the Agricultural Research Service's European Biological Control Laboratory (EBCL) near Montpellier, France.
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