biologistic


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biologistic

(baɪˌɒləˈdʒɪstɪk)
adj
relating to biologism
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Adj.1.biologistic - of or relating to biologismbiologistic - of or relating to biologism    
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The chapters are set out in chronological order, dealing with texts which demonstrate how Anglophone writers have dealt with their Gaelic subjects in a variety of ways, including civilising missions, assimilation, Romanticisation, stereotyping and, perhaps most discomforting for readers with the benefit of twenty-first-century hindsight, biologistic racial typologising.
As anyone who has read Michaels's work over the last 20 years or so can rehearse, ethnic culture emerges as a useful term when we want to talk categorically about groups we don't feel comfortable defining racially, but the term in fact can't function absent a biologistic concept of inheritance: it's not accidental that, for example, Jews might feel Jewish cultural totems as a birthright or African Americans might feel "African" cultural totems as one.
It is true that the Soviets rejected the kinds of biologistic language common in other countries.
In the majority of instances, health teams still develop Health Education in a biologistic, mechanical and acritical manner, in spite of the recent methodological and theoretical reorientation (16).
Taken at face value, this might strike one as essentially biologistic.
Thatcher's rhetorical skill was demonstrated in this regard, as she converted the radical implications of Nicholson's question--that a critical mass of women politicians might fundamentally change the structure of formal politics through their gendered difference--into the valorisation of biologistic sex difference: "You'll see no man as tough as any woman is in defence of her children".
The recourse to evolutionary psychology leads to biologistic explanations which give capitalism an essentialized psychological core.
He returned to his earlier work on Samoa and embraced a biologistic approach to the study of human behaviour that culminated in his controversial attack on Boasian cultural anthropology in Margaret Mead and Samoa: The making and unmaking of an anthropological myth (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1983).
On behalf of this individualistic comprehension, biologistic, the minor's law was applied by the judge from a positive justification, which transited between the dilemma of satisfying a welfare speech and a need for social control.
The term meme, of course, derives from Richard Dawkins's biologistic account of how genetic and nongenetic data spread, like viruses, through their corporeal transmitters.
a biologistic notion of sacrifice whereby the killing of the latter