biomass


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Related to biomass: Biomass energy, Biomass pyramid

bi·o·mass

 (bī′ō-măs′)
n.
1. The total mass of living matter within a given unit of environmental area.
2. Plant material, vegetation, or agricultural waste used as a fuel or energy source.

biomass

(ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs)
n
1. (Environmental Science) the total number of living organisms in a given area, expressed in terms of living or dry weight per unit area
2. (Biology) vegetable matter used as a source of energy

bi•o•mass

(ˈbaɪ oʊˌmæs)

n.
1. the amount of living matter in a given habitat, expressed either as the weight of organisms per unit area or as the volume of organisms per unit volume of habitat.
2. organic matter that can be converted to fuel and is therefore regarded as a potential energy source.
[1930–35]

bi·o·mass

(bī′ō-măs′)
1. The total amount of living material in a given habitat.
2. Organic materials, such as plant matter and manure, that have not become fossilized and are used as a fuel or energy source. Biomass fuels produce less carbon dioxide than some fossil fuels, such as petroleum.
Did You Know? The matter that makes up the Earth's living organisms is called biomass. Insects alone make up an amazing amount of biomass. The biologist J.B.S. Haldane was once asked if the study of life on the Earth gave him any insights into God. Haldane replied jokingly that his research revealed that God must have "an inordinate fondness for beetles." Haldane made his comment because there are more beetle species—almost 400,000 now known—than species of any other animal. And beetles are only one kind of insect, of which there are almost one million species that are known and perhaps many millions more yet to be discovered. The number of individual insects is mind-boggling, about 10 quintillion (that's 10,000,000,000,000,000,000). So all those little critters add up. Insects together probably have more biomass than any other type of land animal. And if we added up all the weights of all the people in the world, the biomass of all the insects would be 300 times as great.

biomass

The chemical energy in growing plants, hence biomass fuels (firewood, dried dung, and biogas).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biomass - plant materials and animal waste used as fuel
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
2.biomass - the total mass of living matter in a given unit area
mass - the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
Translations
biomassa

biomass

[ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs] Nbiomasa f
References in periodicals archive ?
Three pilot projects are demonstrating gasification as a way to produce electricity from biomass at a smaller distributed scale (40 to 200 kilowatts [kW]) in addition to a small commercial unit (500 kW).
Gas de France considers building 4 biomass energy plants in different Bulgarian cities.
Key words: energy economics, sustainable biomass, sustainability safeguards
Today, Oregonians are beginning to understand that this has resulted in a landscape of densely stocked forestlands choked with excess woody biomass.
The Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (PSCW) has created a docket to begin evaluating Xcel Energy's request to install biomass gasification technology at the Bay Front Power Plant in Ashland, Wis.
In the hopes of saving its plant, Atikokan began to consider ways of using biomass as an acceptable alternative or additive to coal, thus enabling the town's primary employer to keep its doors open and preserve its 90 jobs.
According to the survey, the biomass market expects a rapid growth of three-fold in 2012 from 2005 with 25.
DISCUSSION: The patient was diagnosed with "hut lung," a term that refers to the noninfectious, nonmalignant respiratory manifestations of chronic, high-level exposures to biomass smoke.
North Americans, for the most part, are able to pay the going global rate for energy, but that does not mean biomass is being ignored on the home front.
With recent price jumps in oil, more Japanese mills are finding it efficient to make the switch to biomass fuel.
A study of biofuels released by the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) last July reports that biomass fuels from such sources could supply as much as 30 percent of the nation's fuel needs by 2050.
Most woody biomass utilization activities are implemented by the Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Energy (DOE), and the Interior and include awarding grants to businesses, schools, Indian tribes, and others; conducting research; and providing education.