biomass


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Related to biomass: Biomass energy, Biomass pyramid

bi·o·mass

 (bī′ō-măs′)
n.
1. The total mass of living matter within a given unit of environmental area.
2. Plant or animal material, such as forestry byproducts or agricultural waste, that is used as a fuel or energy source.

biomass

(ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs)
n
1. (Environmental Science) the total number of living organisms in a given area, expressed in terms of living or dry weight per unit area
2. (Biology) vegetable matter used as a source of energy

bi•o•mass

(ˈbaɪ oʊˌmæs)

n.
1. the amount of living matter in a given habitat, expressed either as the weight of organisms per unit area or as the volume of organisms per unit volume of habitat.
2. organic matter that can be converted to fuel and is therefore regarded as a potential energy source.
[1930–35]

bi·o·mass

(bī′ō-măs′)
1. The total amount of living material in a given habitat.
2. Organic materials, such as plant matter and manure, that have not become fossilized and are used as a fuel or energy source. Biomass fuels produce less carbon dioxide than some fossil fuels, such as petroleum.
Did You Know? The matter that makes up the Earth's living organisms is called biomass. Insects alone make up an amazing amount of biomass. The biologist J.B.S. Haldane was once asked if the study of life on the Earth gave him any insights into God. Haldane replied jokingly that his research revealed that God must have "an inordinate fondness for beetles." Haldane made his comment because there are more beetle species—almost 400,000 now known—than species of any other animal. And beetles are only one kind of insect, of which there are almost one million species that are known and perhaps many millions more yet to be discovered. The number of individual insects is mind-boggling, about 10 quintillion (that's 10,000,000,000,000,000,000). So all those little critters add up. Insects together probably have more biomass than any other type of land animal. And if we added up all the weights of all the people in the world, the biomass of all the insects would be 300 times as great.

biomass

The chemical energy in growing plants, hence biomass fuels (firewood, dried dung, and biogas).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biomass - plant materials and animal waste used as fuel
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
2.biomass - the total mass of living matter in a given unit area
mass - the property of a body that causes it to have weight in a gravitational field
Translations
biomassa

biomass

[ˈbaɪəʊˌmæs] Nbiomasa f
References in periodicals archive ?
Financial considerations of policy options to enhance biomass utilization for reducing wildfire hazards.
We wanted to develop markets for forest products, and looked at using biomass in our building.
Although low temperature fuel cells powered by methanol or hydrogen have been well studied, existing low temperature fuel cell technologies cannot directly use biomass as a fuel because of the lack of an effective catalyst system for polymeric materials.
Biomass to energy has been acknowledged as a clean and renewable source of energy.
But the reality is that the age of biomass will soon be upon us.
Together, HWENERGY and Pennine Biomass will deliver a complete biomass heat solution to customers, offering design, build, operation, fuel supply and on-going service and maintenance for non-domestic properties.
According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), which was formed during the oil shocks of the early 1970s to help ward off future energy shortages, biomass combustion is a carbon-neutral process because the carbon dioxide released at burning has previously been absorbed by the plants from the atmosphere.
California implemented PURPA to encourage biomass, wind and solar energy, leading to emergence of the biomass-to-electricity industry in the 1980s and early 1990s.
Gas de France considers building 4 biomass energy plants in different Bulgarian cities.
Key words: energy economics, sustainable biomass, sustainability safeguards
The Smurfit-Stone conversion to biomass is not alone.
Today, Oregonians are beginning to understand that this has resulted in a landscape of densely stocked forestlands choked with excess woody biomass.