bionic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

bi·on·ic

 (bī-ŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to bionics.
2. Having anatomical structures or physiological processes that are replaced or enhanced by electronic or mechanical components.
3. Having extraordinary strength, powers, or capabilities; superhuman.

bionic

(baɪˈɒnɪk)
adj
1. (Electronics) of or relating to bionics
2. (Electronics) (in science fiction) having certain physiological functions augmented or replaced by electronic equipment: the bionic man.

bi•on•ic

(baɪˈɒn ɪk)

adj.
1. having normal functions enhanced by electronic devices and mechanical parts for dangerous or intricate tasks.
2. of or pertaining to bionics.
[1955–60]
bi•on′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bionic - of or relating to bionics
2.bionic - having particular physiological functions augmented or replaced by electronic or electromechanical componentsbionic - having particular physiological functions augmented or replaced by electronic or electromechanical components
artificial, unreal - contrived by art rather than nature; "artificial flowers"; "artificial flavoring"; "an artificial diamond"; "artificial fibers"; "artificial sweeteners"
Translations
bionický
bionisk
bionikus
tölvulíffræîilegur
bionický
biyonikdirim elektronik

bionic

[baɪˈɒnɪk] ADJbiónico

bionic

[baɪˈɒnɪk] adjbionique

bionic

adjbionisch

bionics

(baiˈoniks) noun singular
the use of biological principles in the design of computers etc.
biˈonic adjective
of or using bionics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lindsay and Lee were last paired onscreen in the 1994 TV-movie, 'Bionic Ever After,' but their beloved television series 'The Six Million Dollar Man' (1974-1978) and 'The Bionic Woman' (1976-1978) are still much-anticipated in rerun heaven.
Ossur's sensor-equipped bionic limbs include an extremely advanced knee, making it possible for amputees to move over uneven terrain, walk down steps and even stand upright on an incline while bearing a load something that, without a good, functional knee, is difficult to do.
When Apple debuted its new flagship phone and its 10th anniversary iPhone, it introduced the A11 Bionic chip that's a 64-bit ARM-based system on chip (SoC).
Gillyan Cullen, 18, is a keen Highland and ballet dancer - and hopes a bionic hand will help her with her hobby and cope better with everyday life.
Tilly Lockey, an 11-year-old from Durham who lost her hands after she developed meningitis as a baby, told the BBC her prototype bionic hand "looks awesome and it makes you feel confident.
The 11-year-old, of Consett, is taking part in the world's first clinical trial of 3D printed bionic hands for kids, which started this week in Britain.
At the moment, if you lose your hand, there are only two basic prosthetics that the NHS can provide and private manufacturers can charge as much as PS60,000 for bionic hands.
The world's first trial of 3D printed bionic prosthetics is under way in Britain.
Kianoush Nazarpour, a senior lecturer in biomedical engineering at Newcastle University said: "Using computer vision, we have developed a bionic hand which can respond automatically --in fact, just like a real hand, the user can reach out and pick up a cup or a biscuit with nothing more than a quick glance in the right direction.
To date, the development of Australia's bionic eye' has been funded through a five year AU$50 million Special Research Initiative grant administered by the Australian Research Council.
Nocera and his colleague Pamela Silver later developed this concept further, to produce a bionic leaf able to capture one-tenth of the energy in sunlight and turn it into fuel.
The bionic eye system captures visual information in a spectacles-mounted camera, which wirelessly sends signals to the retinal implant that stimulates the optic nerve cells.