biopiracy


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bi·o·pi·ra·cy

 (bī′ō-pī′rə-sē)
n.
The commercial development of biological compounds or genetic sequences by a technologically advanced country or organization without obtaining consent from or providing fair compensation to the peoples or nations in whose territory the materials were discovered.

bi′o·pi′rate (bī′ō-pī′rĭt) n.

biopiracy

(ˈbaɪəʊˌpaɪrəsɪ)
n
(Pharmacology) the use of wild plants by international companies to develop medicines, without recompensing the countries from which they are taken
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.biopiracy - biological theftbiopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
larceny, stealing, theft, thievery, thieving - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
Translations

biopiracy

[ˌbaɪəˈpaɪərəsɪ] Nbiopiratería f
References in periodicals archive ?
He noted that maca's popularity among China's massive and growing middle class has had wide-ranging repercussions, including threatening the supply for other countries, biopiracy, violence, an increase in low-quality maca and natives unable to purchase their traditional food.
This knowledge is a precious heritage, accumulated over the years and deserves to be protected, both for future generation, and from biopiracy and unjustified patenting by others, by placing them in public domain, he added.
Aware that it would be impossible to control the sharing of knowledge or distinguish between what was given out voluntarily and what was obtained illegally, the constituent assembly that drafted the Constitution included language that would at least help Ecuador avoid biopiracy.
India has been a victim of misappropriation or biopiracy of our genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, which have been patented in other countries (well known examples include neem and haldi).
IPR becomes another name for intellectual theft and biopiracy when it denies Indigenes their right to use products of their own ingenuity.
It permits biopiracy, and means that researchers in pharmaceutical companies may now be the biggest single readership of old colonial travelogues.
This biopiracy, as it is often referred to when other biological products such as plants, seeds and genes are involved, is one of the greatest threats to Africa's richest asset, its biodiversity.
Biopiracy also perpetuates market monopolies and excludes the original innovators from the rightful share of local and national markets.
Biopiracy is the practice of patenting and marketing the use of traditional knowledge and genetic resources of indigenous peoples without authorization from source countries.
What is the Vavilov Institute's position on the controversy around biopiracy and patents on seeds?
Leo Saldanha of Environment Support Group, who is fighting a case of biopiracy against seed firm Mahyco, said: " the proposal amounts to legalising biopiracy".