biopsychology

(redirected from biopsychological)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to biopsychological: Biopsychosocial, Biopsychosocial model, Biopsychosocial approach

bi·o·psy·chol·o·gy

 (bī′ō-sī-kŏl′ə-jē)

biopsychology

(ˌbaɪəʊsaɪˈkɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Psychology) another name for psychobiology
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References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of these illusions is not just to illustrate our embodied nature, but also to question the biopsychological process through which we engage the created world.
Moreover, using a biopsychological perspective to examine various phenomena in athletic populations and recreational exercisers has become increasingly popular during recent years (Acevedo and Ekkekakis, 2006; Ehrlenspiel and Trailer, 2012).
Therefore, drug addiction issue should be viewed as a multidisciplinary phenomenon whose causes are to be sought in the interplay between biopsychological, familial and social factors, and in the interplay between risk and protective factors (UNODC 2009; NIDA 2003).
Inspired by the literature, this article seeks to explore new valuable risk prediction factors based on the individual's biopsychological behavior.
Children and youth in sport: A biopsychological perspective (2nd ed.
Experienced, qualified training officers can reinforce these biopsychological responses learned at the academy by having the young officers verbalize what they saw and felt following high-arousal incidents, such as high-speed chases and calls involving armed suspects or suspicious persons.
The meanings of concepts are created, maintained, or developed within discourse communities, a domain, a culture, or a society among biopsychological systems having a material body.
Second, the effectiveness of proximal processes is determined by the biopsychological characteristics of the individual, the immediate and distant environments in which the proximal processes occur, and the developmental outcome being examined.
Psychopathology, Biopsychological Factors, Crime Characteristics and Classification of 2.
Slowly, yet forcefully, biopsychological processes, genetic inheritance, physical constitution, and life experiences lead the child toward a larger measure of consciousness of his or her own self and of independence.
It Is extremely important for medicine to be conscious of the depth of our desire for health and our fear of illness: they are not only physical or biopsychological conditions that can be faced in a reductionistic approach.
iii) biopsychological identification with tile object perceived to be in need.