bioscience

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bi·o·sci·ence

 (bī′ō-sī′əns)
bi′o·sci′en·tif′ic (-sī′ən-tĭf′ĭk) adj.
bi′o·sci′en·tist n.

bioscience

(ˈbaɪəʊˌsaɪəns)
n
1. (Biology) another name for a life science
2. (Biology) the life sciences collectively
ˌbioscienˈtific adj
ˌbioˈscientist n

bi•o•sci•ence

(ˈbaɪ oʊˌsaɪ əns)

n.
any science that deals with the biological aspects of living organisms.
[1960–65]
bi`o•sci`en•tif′ic (-ənˈtɪf ɪk) adj.
bi`o•sci′en•tist, n.

bioscience

any of the sciences that deal with living organisms.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bioscience - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organismsbioscience - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
biomedical science - the application of the principles of the natural sciences to medicine
biometrics, biometry, biostatistics - a branch of biology that studies biological phenomena and observations by means of statistical analysis
craniology - the scientific study of the skulls of various human races
dermatoglyphics - the study of the whorls and loops and arches in the fingertips and on the palms of the hand and the soles of the feet; "some criminologists specialize in dermatoglyphics"
dietetics - the scientific study of food preparation and intake
eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
euthenics - the study of methods of improving human well-being and efficient functioning by improving environmental conditions
medical science - the science of dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention and treatment of disease
Translations

bioscience

n. biociencia, cualquiera de las ciencias naturales relacionadas con el estudio de la conducta y la estructura de organismos vivos.
References in periodicals archive ?
His determination to do something positive led to a chance meeting with Chief Executive, Dr Kevin Slater, an entrepreneurial bioscientist who had worked on human biomarker programmes.
John Pierce, chief bioscientist at BP, sponsors of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Gold award, said: "As a major UK recruiter and investor in research and development, we believe we need to nurture the best technical talent to meet the world's challenges.
A leading bioscientist based in Wales yesterday called for cod liver oil to be allowed free on prescription after his work proved it can slow the onset of arthritis
Scott Twary, a bioscientist and algae researcher who is researching and bioengineering algae that can be converted into clean burning biofuel.
Professor Bruce Caterson, a bioscientist at Cardiff University, says: ``People no longer want to rely on medicine to cure them of aches and pains, they want to prevent illnesses by the use of long term supplements and remedies.
A geneticist and bioscientist by profession, he has a 25-year track record of leadership and management roles in Russell Group and modern universities.
Professor Bruce Caterson,a bioscientist at Cardiff University, says: ``In health terms, there has been a change in attitudes and I believe we will see these changes really take off in 2004.
Our research to date indicates that the technology we are using to produce the vaccine protein in plants will be very cost-effective," said associate professor Palmer, a pharmacologist and plant bioscientist.
Bioscientist Professor Jeremy Lakey, as a result, has raised pounds 400,000 in venture capital from Newcastle-based Northern Enterprise Ltd - providing pounds 600,000 in all to develop further.
AN EMINENT bioscientist who was also a compulsive worrier took his own life after a minor health and safety incident at work which he wrongly believed could trigger his dismissal, an inquest has heard.
Also receiving honorary degrees in July are renowned bioscientist Sir Paul Nurse, director general of the new Crick Institute and president of the Royal Society, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, who will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree for his contribution to advances in cancer research and cell biology.