bioscience

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bi·o·sci·ence

 (bī′ō-sī′əns)
bi′o·sci′en·tif′ic (-sī′ən-tĭf′ĭk) adj.
bi′o·sci′en·tist n.

bioscience

(ˈbaɪəʊˌsaɪəns)
n
1. (Biology) another name for a life science
2. (Biology) the life sciences collectively
ˌbioscienˈtific adj
ˌbioˈscientist n

bi•o•sci•ence

(ˈbaɪ oʊˌsaɪ əns)

n.
any science that deals with the biological aspects of living organisms.
[1960–65]
bi`o•sci`en•tif′ic (-ənˈtɪf ɪk) adj.
bi`o•sci′en•tist, n.

bioscience

any of the sciences that deal with living organisms.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bioscience - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organismsbioscience - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
biomedical science - the application of the principles of the natural sciences to medicine
biometrics, biometry, biostatistics - a branch of biology that studies biological phenomena and observations by means of statistical analysis
craniology - the scientific study of the skulls of various human races
dermatoglyphics - the study of the whorls and loops and arches in the fingertips and on the palms of the hand and the soles of the feet; "some criminologists specialize in dermatoglyphics"
dietetics - the scientific study of food preparation and intake
eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
euthenics - the study of methods of improving human well-being and efficient functioning by improving environmental conditions
medical science - the science of dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention and treatment of disease
Translations

bioscience

n. biociencia, cualquiera de las ciencias naturales relacionadas con el estudio de la conducta y la estructura de organismos vivos.
References in periodicals archive ?
They include two physicians, a bioscientist, and a neuroscientist.
Bioscientist Ms Ho had been a "caring, loving and supportive partner", Mr Jackson said.
AN EMINENT bioscientist who was also a compulsive worrier took his own life after a minor health and safety incident at work which he wrongly believed could trigger his dismissal, an inquest has heard.
Also receiving honorary degrees in July are renowned bioscientist Sir Paul Nurse, director general of the new Crick Institute and president of the Royal Society, winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, who will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree for his contribution to advances in cancer research and cell biology.
Stefan Moisyadi, a veteran bioscientist at UH medical school's Institute for Biogenesis Research (IBR), said in the statement.
Alice Mauchline is a research fellow and bioscientist at the University of Reading who combines her interests in biodiversity and sustainability with pedagogic research focused on improving the student fieldwork experience.
Dr Campbell Tang, pictured right, Principal Bioscientist at CPI and Technical Lead for Marine IB, said: "There is an increasing trend of exploiting the richness of the ocean to replace petrochemicals and fossil fuels.
The long-running debate in journals and in the media between economist Julian Simon of Harvard University and bioscientist Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University included wagers over evidences supporting their convictions.
Despite the vital importance of the emerging area of biotechnology and its role in defense planning and policymaking, no definitive book has been written on the topic for the defense policymaker, the military student, and the private-sector bioscientist interested in the "emerging opportunities market" of national security.
Austin recalls a French bioscientist summing up the megaregional imperative by noting: "It takes 25 million people to make a good fight in the world.
At least one American bioscientist has described the lack of IP harmony between Brazilian industry and the Government of Brazil as reflecting the 'two faces of Brazil'.
RESEARCH: Bioscientist Dr Eithne Costello Picture: TONY KENWRIGHT