bird's-eye


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bird's-eye

(bûrdz′ī′)
n.
1. A fabric woven with a pattern of small diamonds, each having a dot in the center.
2. The pattern of such a fabric.
adj.
1. Marked with a spot or spots resembling a bird's eye or eyes, as the bird's-eye maple or a blue flower having a small circular yellow center.
2. Derived from or as if from an altitude or distance; comprehensive: a bird's-eye survey; a bird's-eye view.

bird's-eye

adj
1.
a. seen or photographed from high above
b. summarizing the main points of a topic; summary (esp in the phrase bird's-eye view)
2. having markings resembling birds' eyes
n
3. (Plants) bird's-eye primrose a Eurasian primrose, Primula farinosa, having clusters of purplish flowers with yellow centres
4. (Plants) bird's-eye speedwell the usual US name for germander speedwell
5. (Plants) any of several other plants having flowers of two contrasting colours
6. (Textiles) a pattern in linen and cotton fabrics, made up of small diamond shapes with a dot in the centre of each
7. (Textiles) a linen or cotton fabric with such a pattern

Birds•eye

(ˈbɜrdzˌaɪ)

n.
Clarence, 1886–1956, U.S. inventor and businessman: developer of food-freezing process.

bird's′-eye`



adj., n., pl. -eyes. adj.
1. seen from above; panoramic: a bird's-eye view of the city.
2. superficial; general: a bird's-eye view of ancient history.
3. having markings resembling birds' eyes: bird's-eye tweed.
n.
4. any of various plants having small, round, bright-colored flowers, as a primrose, Primula farinosa.
5.
a. a pattern in fabric, typically a small diamond with a center dot.
b. a fabric having this pattern.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bird's-eye - as from an altitude or distancebird's-eye - as from an altitude or distance; "a bird's-eye survey"; "a panoramic view"
broad, wide - having great (or a certain) extent from one side to the other; "wide roads"; "a wide necktie"; "wide margins"; "three feet wide"; "a river two miles broad"; "broad shoulders"; "a broad river"
References in classic literature ?
To sum up this development of the art of tele- phony--to present a bird's-eye view--it may be divided into four periods:
From the summit of one of these they had caught a bird's-eye view of its boisterous career for a great distance through the heart of the mountain, with impending rocks and cliffs.
It was a bird's-eye view of creation, as interpreted by science, which, in language always clear and sometimes picturesque, he unfolded before us.
The bird's-eye perspective before her was not so luxuriantly beautiful, perhaps, as that other one which she knew so well; yet it was more cheering.
As for the appearance of Timbuctoo, the reader has but to imagine a collection of billiard-balls and thimbles--such is the bird's-eye view
From a bird's-eye view, these three burgs, the City, the Town, and the University, each presented to the eye an inextricable skein of eccentrically tangled streets.
But the Drachenflieger were away in the second great aeronautic park east of Hamburg, and Bert Smallways saw nothing of them in the bird's-eye view he took of ihe Franconian establishment before they shot him down very neatly.
Dorothea, on the contrary, found the house and grounds all that she could wish: the dark book-shelves in the long library, the carpets and curtains with colors subdued by time, the curious old maps and bird's-eye views on the walls of the corridor, with here and there an old vase below, had no oppression for her, and seemed more cheerful than the easts and pictures at the Grange, which her uncle had long ago brought home from his travels--they being probably among the ideas he had taken in at one time.