bird-watcher


Also found in: Thesaurus.

bird watcher

or bird·watch·er also bird-watch·er (bûrd′wŏch′ər)
n.
A person who observes and identifies birds in their natural surroundings.

bird watching n.

bird-watcher

n
a person who studies wild birds in their natural surroundings
ˈbird-ˌwatching n
Translations

bird-watcher

[ˈbɜːdwɒtʃəʳ<> Nobservador(a) m/f de aves

bird-watcher

[ˈbɜːdˈwɒtʃəʳ] nbird watcher m/f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Sure to inspire the bird-watcher in everyone, nature, conservation, and an appreciation of both are the key components of this feather-friendly venture.
Summary: A British bird-watcher was trampled to death by an elephant near a southern Indian tiger .
Lothar cared for the bird of prey after its discovery by bird-watcher Seamus, 53, at Streamstown, beside Ballisodare Bay, Co Sligo.
This volume will be a welcome addition to the libraries of bird enthusiasts and those wanting to make the leap from bird-watcher to birder.
And that's a statement which keen bird-watcher Jonathan Lane, of New Mill, knows to be true.
Bird-watcher Horatio Clare's mission to follow the migratory path of the common barn swallow may not be your usual bag of birdseed but that's no reason to let this excellent piece of travel writing fly past.
BIRD-WATCHER Brian O'Shea has published a book about the changing countryside after yearly trips to Allesley Village, in Coventry, where he grew up.
Line drawings in black and white blend with naturalists' quotes and reflections on birds, presenting many fine first-person reflections on what makes a bird-watcher, amazing migration feats, unusual nesting habits, and more--all imparted with a tender first-person reflective tone.
He said: "As a bird-watcher your mind is conflicted as you wish to free the bird and also want nature to take it's course.
all my life -- to see a killdeer, which lives on the (North) Slope in Alaska," the 56-year-old bird-watcher exclaimed.
A BLIND bird-watcher spotted 70 species of birds in one day - by their song.
When they turn, they all turn the same way, and you'll see a burst of green suddenly flashing yellow,'' said bird-watcher Louise Epps, a clinical psychologist who is second vice president in the San Fernando Valley Audubon Society.