birth mother


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birth mother

also birth·moth·er (bûrth′mŭth′ər)
n.
One's biological mother.

birth mother

n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) the woman who gives birth to a child, regardless of whether she is the genetic mother or subsequently brings up the child
References in periodicals archive ?
When I opened the door and I saw that woman who was my birth mother all I could think was 'Oh my God, this woman is my mum'.
But when I met my birth mother she said she never signed the adoption papers.
Leach said that not even 24 hours later, her sister emailed her asking her questions, and after exchanging a few messages and a phone call, Leach and her birth mother Kelly Gallant were reunited last week.
Faneela sadly died in 2012, after undergoing surgery linked to injuries she sustained when she was abused by her birth mother as a baby.
Suzanne, 58, said: "My birth mother had to give me up - she wasn't allowed to keep me.
Suzanne was eventually re-united with her birth mother and siblings eight years ago after noticing a family member's name in a newspaper.
However, in three families, when the adult child did not care to interact with the birth family, the adoptive parent did so; in one case, the parents said this was out of compassion for the birth parent, in a second case they said it was because the birth mother and adoptive father had their own long-standing friendship independent of the child, and in a third the parents said it was because the adult child said he preferred it that way.
Her search for her birth mother is a search for understanding how race functions in the development of personal identity.
Closer examination revealed that in 60% of the cases, discrepancies resulted from differences between birth mother and researcher in interpretation of the meaning of joint custody, physical versus legal custody, and custody of children placed informally or living independently.
This person can determine whether the birth mother is interested in a reunion and can serve as a buffer in case she rejects contact with her child.
Cyberspace now is filled with countless "hotlinks," online adoption resources that range from private and public agencies, to chat rooms, to birth mother profiles, to attorneys.
Analyses were conducted to determine if birth mother planned searches were related to their age, marital status and parenting status.