bisociative

bisociative

(baɪˈsəʊsɪətɪv)
adj
relating to bisociation
References in periodicals archive ?
Bisociative abstraction is the key cognitive component of human creativity.
As recounted in Ferber's autobiography, with relevance to the later folly of Simon Axler--and foreshadowing the dramatic implications of bisociative thought advanced by Arthur Koestler in his discussion of drama--Renault's suicide was a subject of jest for her and Kaufman when they wrote Dinner at Eight:
Such thought helps clarify Simon Axler's injurious yet relentless habit of co-opting the bisociative apprehension that, according to Koestler, belongs, at least in high drama, exclusively to one's audience.
He illustrates this process with the Jonah narrative, which highlights the imperative to progress, via bisociative cognizance, from mundane to sublime levels of engagement.
Prior knowledge, bisociative mode of thinking and entrepreneurial opportunity identification.
Rasheed's IA software is based on bisociative brainstorming, a patent-pending process theorizing that focused attention on visual cues can stimulate the mind to see the convergence of trends, predictions, and scenarios.
Also, it is beneficial to apply improved methods of literature mining, searching indirect connections and bisociative knowledge discovery from extensive text databases such as MEDLINE.
Bisociative relationships can only be discovered on the basis of a sufficiently large and diverse underlying corpus of information.
The bisociative quality of metaphor is present in the translator's constant movement between different languages and cultures.
Bisociative thinking both typifies the way original insights emerge and demonstrates the metaphorical nature of inventive thought.
The bisociative patterns found in any domain of creative activity are tri-valent: that is to say, the same pair of matrices can produce comic, tragic, or intellectually challenging effects.
17] Where painting is concerned he places less emphasis upon simultaneity and more upon the viewer's awareness of artistic convention[18] and what he refers to at one point as 'the various bisociative, or bi-focal, processes'[19] of looking at paintings.