bison


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bi·son

 (bī′sən, -zən)
n. pl. bison
1. A bovine mammal (Bison bison) of western North America, having large forequarters, a shaggy mane, and a massive head with short curved horns; a buffalo.
2. A bovine mammal (Bison bonasus) of Europe, similar to the North American bison but with a somewhat smaller head and longer horns; a wisent.
3. The flesh of the North American bison, used as food.

[Latin bisōn, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wisunt.]

bison

(ˈbaɪsən)
n, pl -son
1. (Animals) Also called: American bison or buffalo a member of the cattle tribe, Bison bison, formerly widely distributed over the prairies of W North America but now confined to reserves and parks, with a massive head, shaggy forequarters, and a humped back
2. (Animals) Also called: wisent or European bison a closely related and similar animal, Bison bonasus, formerly widespread in Europe
[C14: from Latin bisōn, of Germanic origin; related to Old English wesand, Old Norse vīsundr]

bi•son

(ˈbaɪ sən, -zən)

n., pl. -son.
1. a North American buffalo, Bison bison, having a large head and high, humped shoulders.
2. Also called wisent. a related buffalo, Bison bonasus, of Europe, less shaggy and slightly larger than the American bison: nearly extinct in the wild.
[1350–1400; Middle English bisontes (pl.) < Latin (nominative singular bisōn) < Germanic]
bi′son•tine` (-ˌtaɪn) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bison - any of several large humped bovids having shaggy manes and large heads and short hornsbison - any of several large humped bovids having shaggy manes and large heads and short horns
bovid - hollow-horned ruminants
genus Bison - sometimes considered a subgenus of genus Bos: American buffalo
American bison, American buffalo, Bison bison, buffalo - large shaggy-haired brown bison of North American plains
aurochs, Bison bonasus, wisent - European bison having a smaller and higher head than the North American bison
Translations
بيسون: ثور وحشي أمريكيجاموس وحشي أوروبي
бизон
zubrbizonbizon evropský
bisonoksevildokse
BisonWisentAmerikanischer Bison
vísundur
bizonasstumbras
bizonssumbrs
bizonżubr
auroquebisãobisão-americanobisão-europeu
zubor
bisonoxeeuropeisk bisonvisent
bizonyabani sığır
американський бізонамериканський зубрбізонзубр

bison

[ˈbaɪsən] N (bison (bisons (pl))) → bisonte m

bison

[ˈbaɪsən] [bison] [ˈbaɪsən] (pl) n (mainly British) (= buffalo) → bison m

bison

n (American) → Bison m; (European) → Wisent m

bison

[ˈbaɪsn] nbisonte m

bison

(ˈbaisn) plurals ˈbison (rare) ˈbisons noun
1. the American buffalo. a herd of bison.
2. the large European wild ox.
References in classic literature ?
Bison is the better word; and I would suggest the necessity of adopting it in future, when you shall have occasion to allude to the species.
Tom Loker we left groaning and touzling in a most immaculately clean Quaker bed, under the motherly supervision of Aunt Dorcas, who found him to the full as tractable a patient as a sick bison.
And before we judge of them too harshly we must remem- ber what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races.
Whin I was about three-quarters av a mile off the rest-camp, powtherin' along fit to burrst, I heard the noise av the men, an', on my sowl, Sorr, I cud catch the voice av Peg Barney bellowin' like a bison wid the belly-ache.
In fact, these are the finest morsels, like the hump of the bison, the paws of the bear, and the head of the wild boar.
He had covered but a short distance from the forest when I beheld the first of his pursuers--a Sagoth, one of those grim and terrible gorilla-men who guard the mighty Mahars in their buried cities, faring forth from time to time upon slave-raiding or punitive expeditions against the human race of Pellucidar, of whom the dominant race of the inner world think as we think of the bison or the wild sheep of our own world.
With my glass I could make out a species of large red deer, some antelope and what appeared to be a species of horse; and once I saw the shaggy form of what might have been a monstrous bison.
We had watched them following the herds of cattle and bison and dragging down the calves, the aged, and the sick.
His face was brown like a nut; he had very bright and restless brown eyes; his dark hair was brushed back stiffly in front and cropped close behind, outlining a square and powerful skull; and he had a huge black moustache like the horns of a bison.
Deer, antelope, bison, horses, sheep, and goats were all in sight at the same time, and at a little distance a great megatherium reared up on its huge tail and massive hind feet to tear the leaves from a tall tree.
To the bison of the prairie it is a few inches of palatable grass, with water to drink; unless he seeks the Shelter of the forest or the mountain's shadow.
Bison remaining in Yellowstone by 1902, following years of Western expansion that nearly eradicated the species beyond the park's borders.