bitonality


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bitonality

(ˌbaɪtəʊˈnælɪtɪ)
n
the quality of two musical keys being played simultaneously
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
States of Mind--The Farewells" by Umberto Boccioni, explores the "states of mind in a modern, mechanized society" that Rollin illustrates using bitonality, with the right hand on black keys and the left hand on white keys.
Rigoletto" provided a dramatic foil to Au's drooling Duke, with the latter gamely spitting out "La donna e mobile" during the rapid stylistic shifts of Granger's eclectic score, which also encompasses bitonality and jazz riffs.
9 and 10, respectively), Murchison reveals how Copland largely adapted his earlier compositional techniques such as ostinatos, pedals, polyrhythmic complexities, and bitonality into a more accessible idiom, while simultaneously pulling from Stravinsky's use of segmented folk tunes.
Here delicious bitonality - working in two keys at once - turned into a tumultuous conclusion.
And although Kevin Gill did what he could tomake something out of the organ part (and an instrument in need of a good tuning) one constantly had anuneasy feeling of bitonality, even in fully accompanied passages.
This sense of secure centeredness was weakened in the late 19th century by the increasing use of chromaticism (pitches outside the major or minor key in force), and decisively challenged in the early years of the 20th century by a number of factors: the use of new scales derived from ethnic music; impressionism, which treats chords and dissonances very differently than in the system based on major and minor; bitonality (simultaneous use of two keys); unpredictable beat patterns; and especially atonality and dodecaphony, both of which avoid any sense of key center.
In addition to a melodic line agitated in its intervals, the sharp bitonality (often in the interval of a minor second) and polyrythms create a complex of expressive techniques that is characteristic not only of Marysa, but of Burian's other work in the period 1937-48, interrupted in 1941-45, when by some miracle the composer survived imprisonment in a series of concentration camps.
Voice may also have a bitonality or diplophonia, with the perception of two different fundamental frequencies (or pitches) simultaneously.
His melding of classical and jazz idioms always seemed particularly fresh, incorporating tone rows reminiscent of Schoenberg, bitonality a la Stravinsky/Milhaud, Bachian chorales and counterpoint, and stride straight out of Fats Waller.