bitter orange

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Related to bitter oranges: Citrus aurantium

bitter orange

n.
1. An orange tree (Citrus aurantium) that is widely cultivated in warm regions and has reddish-orange, highly acidic fruit.
2. The fruit of this tree. In both senses also called bigarade, Seville orange, sour orange.

bitter orange

n
(Plants) another name for Seville orange
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bitter orange - any of various common orange trees yielding sour or bitter fruitbitter orange - any of various common orange trees yielding sour or bitter fruit; used as grafting stock
bitter orange, Seville orange, sour orange - highly acidic orange used especially in marmalade
genus Citrus - orange; lemon; lime; etc.
orange tree, orange - any citrus tree bearing oranges
2.bitter orange - highly acidic orange used especially in marmaladebitter orange - highly acidic orange used especially in marmalade
orange - round yellow to orange fruit of any of several citrus trees
bigarade, bitter orange, bitter orange tree, Citrus aurantium, marmalade orange, Seville orange, sour orange - any of various common orange trees yielding sour or bitter fruit; used as grafting stock
References in periodicals archive ?
Unless Jose inspires his charges to the rare levels seen yesterday, Sevilla - once famed for its bitter oranges - could leave him with a decidedly sour Champions League taste in his mouth.
There is some biscuity sweetness in the aroma, matched with a hint of bitter oranges in the background.
The mystery was that this shipment was also said to contain bitter oranges and a batch of Spanish onions.
For almost every month there is a special ingredient to be used at the peak of its powers, and right now, across Andalucia in southern Spain, the wonderful bitter oranges are at their very best.
Jams were made from sour cherries, bitter oranges, baby eggplants, and carrots.
Bitter oranges (Citrus aurantium) are used for making jams, and their zest (the top layer of an orange's peel) flavors orange liqueurs, like Grand Marnier, Cointreau, and Triple Sec.
Other orange liqueurs are usually made from a combination of sweet and bitter oranges.
Common orange trading in the Mediterranean didn't begin until the 1300s, when merchants in Nice began trade in bitter oranges, a fruit that had enjoyed popularity in China and Japan for millennia.
Angostura Orange Bitters is made from a blend of citrus essence and oils from sweet and bitter oranges with spices from the secret recipe.