speculum

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spec·u·lum

 (spĕk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. spec·u·la (-lə) or spec·u·lums
1. A mirror or polished metal plate used as a reflector in optical instruments.
2. An instrument for dilating the opening of a body cavity for medical examination.
3. Zoology
a. A bright, often iridescent patch of color on the wings of certain birds, especially ducks.
b. A transparent spot in the wings of some butterflies or moths.

[Middle English, surgical speculum, from Latin, mirror, from specere, to look at; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

speculum

(ˈspɛkjʊləm)
n, pl -la (-lə) or -lums
1. (General Physics) a mirror, esp one made of polished metal for use in a telescope, etc
2. (Medicine) med an instrument for dilating a bodily cavity or passage to permit examination of its interior
3. (Zoology) a patch of distinctive colour on the wing of a bird, esp in certain ducks
[C16: from Latin: mirror, from specere to look at]

spec•u•lum

(ˈspɛk yə ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə), -lums.
1. a mirror or reflector, esp. one of polished metal, as on a reflecting telescope.
2. a medical instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation, as by enlarging an orifice.
3. a lustrous or colored area on the wings of certain birds.
[1590–1600; < Latin: mirror, derivative of spec(ere) to look]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.speculum - a mirror (especially one made of polished metal) for use in an optical instrumentspeculum - a mirror (especially one made of polished metal) for use in an optical instrument
mirror - polished surface that forms images by reflecting light
2.speculum - a medical instrument for dilating a bodily passage or cavity in order to examine the interior
medical instrument - instrument used in the practice of medicine
Translations
Spekulum

speculum

[ˈspekjʊləm] N (speculums, specula (pl)) → espéculo m

speculum

n pl <specula> (Med) → Spekulum nt; (in telescope) → Metallspiegel m

spec·u·lum

n. espéculo, instrumento para dilatar un conducto o cavidad.

speculum

n (pl -la o -lums) espéculo
References in classic literature ?
Fear of the primitive, borderland law, of which he had read highly colored, imaginary tales, had thrust him into the jungle a fugitive.
Richard and Clarissa, however, still remained on the borderland.
I look back at the chain of incidents, my interview with McArdle, Challenger's first note of alarm in the Times, the absurd journey in the train, the pleasant luncheon, the catastrophe, and now it has come to this--that we linger alone upon an empty planet, and so sure is our fate that I can regard these lines, written from mechanical professional habit and never to be seen by human eyes, as the words of one who is already dead, so closely does he stand to the shadowed borderland over which all outside this one little circle of friends have already gone.