black eye


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black eye

n.
1. A bruised discoloration of the flesh surrounding the eye, often resulting from a blow.
2. A blow to one's reputation; a source of dishonor.

black eye

n
bruising round the eye

black′ eye′


n.
1. discoloration of the skin around the eye, resulting from a blow, bruise, etc.
2. a damaged reputation.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.black eye - a swollen bruise caused by a blow to the eyeblack eye - a swollen bruise caused by a blow to the eye
bruise, contusion - an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration
2.black eye - a bad reputationblack eye - a bad reputation; "his behavior gave the whole family a black eye"
reputation, repute - the state of being held in high esteem and honor
3.black eye - an unfortunate happening that hinders or impedesblack eye - an unfortunate happening that hinders or impedes; something that is thwarting or frustrating
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
whammy - a serious or devastating setback

black eye

noun
1. A bruise surrounding the eye:
Informal: mouse.
Slang: shiner.
2. A mark of discredit or disgrace:
Archaic: attaint.
Idiom: a blot on one's escutcheon.
Translations
عَيْنٌ مُتَوَرِّمَه
monokl
blåt øje
véraláfutásos szem
glóîarauga
modrina na oku
morarmış göz

black eye

nocchio nero
to give sb a black eye → fare un occhio nero a qn

black

(blӕk) adjective
1. of the colour in which these words are printed. black paint.
2. without light. a black night; The night was black and starless.
3. dirty. Your hands are black!; black hands from lifting coal.
4. without milk. black coffee.
5. evil. black magic.
6. (often offensive. currently acceptable in the United States, South Africa etc) Negro, of African, West Indian descent.
7. (especially South Africa) coloured; of mixed descent (increasingly used by people of mixed descent to refer to themselves).
noun
1. the colour in which these words are printed. Black and white are opposites.
2. something (eg paint) black in colour. I've used up all the black.
3. (often with capital. often offensive: currently acceptable in the United states, South Africa etc) a Negro; a person of African, West Indian etc descent.
verb
to make black.
ˈblackness noun
ˈblacken verb
1. to make or become black. The sky blackened before the storm.
2. to make to seem bad. She blackened his character.
3. to clean with black polish. He blackened his boots.
black art/magic
magic performed for evil reasons. He tries to practise black magic.
ˈblackbird noun
a dark-coloured bird of the thrush family.
ˈblackboard noun
a dark-coloured board for writing on in chalk (used especially in schools).
black box
a built-in machine for automatic recording of the details of a plane's flight. They found the black box two miles away from the wreckage of the crashed plane.
the Black Death noun
the plague that killed large numbers of people in Europe in the 14th to 18th centuries.
black eye
an eye with bad bruising around it (eg from a punch). George gave me a black eye.
ˈblackhead noun
a small black-topped lump in a pore of the skin, especially of the face.
ˈblacklist noun
a list of people who are out of favour etc.
verb
to put (a person etc) on such a list.
ˈblackmail verb
to obtain money illegally from (a person), usually by threatening to make known something which the victim wants to keep secret.
noun
the act of blackmailing. money got by blackmail.
ˈblackmailer noun
Black Maria (məˈraiə)
a prison van. The policeman took the three suspects to the police station in a Black Maria.
black market
(a place for) the illegal buying and selling, at high prices, of goods that are scarce, rationed etc. coffee on the black market.
black marketeer
a person who sells goods on the black market.
ˈblackout noun
1. a period of darkness produced by putting out all lights. Accidents increase during a blackout.
2. a ban (on news etc). a blackout of news about the coup.
3. a period of unconsciousness. He has had several blackouts during his illness.
4. a brief, temporary loss of memory, as when an actor forgets his/her lines.
5. (also outage) a period of a general power failure.
6. (in the theatre) the putting out of the stage lights at the end of a scene etc.
black sheep
a member of a family or group who is unsatisfactory in some way. My brother is the black sheep of the family.
ˈblacksmith noun
a person who makes and repairs by hand things made of iron. The blacksmith made a new shoe for the horse.
black and blue
badly bruised. After the fight the boy was all black and blue.
black out
to lose consciousness. He blacked out for almost a minute.
in black and white
in writing or print. Would you put that down in black and white?

black eye

n ojo morado
References in classic literature ?
Looking in the same direction, I saw that the knot-hole in the wall had indeed become a human eye--a full, black eye, that glared into my own with an entire lack of expression more awful than the most devilish glitter.
Pickwick how they had all been down in a body to inspect the furniture and fittings- up of the house, which the young couple were to tenant, after the Christmas holidays; at which communication Bella and Trundle both coloured up, as red as the fat boy after the taproom fire; and the young lady with the black eyes and the fur round the boots, whispered something in Emily's ear, and then glanced archly at Mr.
But the girl with the black eyes caught his arm, following him and dragging her companion after her, as she cried:
She had a round, sly, piquant face and pretty black eyes.
And he could see that she had detected it with those steady, brilliant black eyes.
Suddenly, the stranger woman whom we have described, and who had, in the course of her work, come near enough to hear Tom's last words, raised her heavy black eyes, and fixed them, for a second, on him; then, taking a quantity of cotton from her basket, she placed it in his.
He at once fished out his instrument, and commenced to play "Two Lovely Black Eyes.
Peg's black eyes, in which shone a more than usually wild and fitful light, roved scrutinizingly over the church, then settled on our pew.
Her beauty was gone--her face had fallen away to mere skin and bone; the contrast between her ghastly complexion and her steely glittering black eyes was more startling than ever.
She was a very pretty little girl, with her mother's black eyes and hair, and rosy cheeks, and the merry expression which was her inheritance from her father.
His black eyes roved everywhere, catching the movements of twigs and branches where small birds hopped, questing ever onward through the changing vistas of trees and brush, and returning always to the clumps of undergrowth on either side.
Tulliver, desiring her daughter to have a curled crop, "like other folks's children," had had it cut too short in front to be pushed behind the ears; and as it was usually straight an hour after it had been taken out of paper, Maggie was incessantly tossing her head to keep the dark, heavy locks out of her gleaming black eyes,--an action which gave her very much the air of a small Shetland pony.