black gum


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black gum

or black·gum (blăk′gŭm′)
n.
A deciduous tree (Nyssa sylvatica) of eastern North America, having glossy, somewhat leathery leaves that turn bright scarlet or orange in the fall. Also called pepperidge, sour gum.

sour′ gum`


n.
a tupelo, Nyssa sylvatica, of E North America, with egg-shaped leaves and round, dark blue fruit.
Also called black gum, pepperidge.
[1775–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.black gum - columnar tree of eastern North America having horizontal limbs and small leaves that emerge late in spring and have brilliant color in early fallblack gum - columnar tree of eastern North America having horizontal limbs and small leaves that emerge late in spring and have brilliant color in early fall
tupelo tree, tupelo - any of several gum trees of swampy areas of North America
2.black gum - a small mallee with rough dark-colored bark toward the butt; yields a red eucalyptus kino gum
mallee - any of several low-growing Australian eucalypts
References in periodicals archive ?
CSX and Alliance for Community Trees will plant 65 large spruce and loblolly pine, black gum, southern red oak, Kentucky coffee, redbud, American elm and crape myrtle trees along Boulevard Drive, which runs by the Fulton Cotton Mill and the CSX Container facility.
Students in Richard Howarth's AP environmental science class and Anna Dahlberg's Life Skills class spent the early part of the morning digging holes; after a speaking segment featuring local dignitaries and two students, the planting of Bald Cypress and Black Gum trees began on three parking lot islands.
Belonging to yet another group are black gum and tupelo, which are members of the dogwood family.
You may wish to consider the installation of a flowering tree such as a Kousa dogwood, or an Eastern Redbud, Cornel Cherry, Japanese Stewartia, Magnolia, Flowering Crabapple, Black Gum Tree, Sourwood or a Mountain Ash.
Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky)- Foliage at this park includes the changing colors of black gum, poison ivy, and dogwood, peaking from mid to late October.
One is a quarter-mile long, the other a mile and a half walk that includes a visit to the Black Gum Swamp on a board walkway.