black out


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black

 (blăk)
adj. black·er, black·est
1. Being of the color black, producing or reflecting comparatively little light and having no predominant hue.
2. Having little or no light: a black, moonless night.
3. also Black
a. Of or belonging to a racial group having brown to black skin, especially one of African origin: the black population of South Africa.
b. Of or belonging to an American ethnic group descended from African peoples having dark skin; African-American.
4. Very dark in color: rich black soil; black, wavy hair.
5. Being a trail, as for skiing, marked with a sign having a black diamond, indicating a high level of difficulty.
6. Soiled, as from soot; dirty: feet black from playing outdoors.
7. Evil; wicked: the pirates' black deeds.
8. Cheerless and depressing; gloomy: black thoughts.
9. Being or characterized by morbid or grimly satiric humor: a black comedy.
10. Marked by anger or sullenness: gave me a black look.
11. Attended with disaster; calamitous: a black day; the stock market crash on Black Friday.
12. Deserving of, indicating, or incurring censure or dishonor: "Man ... has written one of his blackest records as a destroyer on the oceanic islands" (Rachel Carson).
13. Wearing clothing of the darkest visual hue: the black knight.
14. Served without milk or cream: black coffee.
15. Appearing to emanate from a source other than the actual point of origin. Used chiefly of intelligence operations: black propaganda; black radio transmissions.
16. Disclosed, for reasons of security, only to an extremely limited number of authorized persons; very highly classified: black programs in the Defense Department; the Pentagon's black budget.
17. Chiefly British Boycotted as part of a labor union action.
n.
1.
a. The achromatic color value of minimum lightness or maximum darkness; the color of objects that absorb nearly all light of all visible wavelengths; one extreme of the neutral gray series, the opposite being white. Although strictly a response to zero stimulation of the retina, the perception of black appears to depend on contrast with surrounding color stimuli.
b. A pigment or dye having this color value.
2. Complete or almost complete absence of light; darkness.
3. Clothing of the darkest hue, especially such clothing worn for mourning.
4. also Black
a. A member of a racial group having brown to black skin, especially one of African origin.
b. An American descended from peoples of African origin having brown to black skin; an African American.
5. Something that is colored black.
6. Games
a. The black-colored pieces, as in chess or checkers.
b. The player using these pieces.
7. The condition of making or operating at a profit: worked hard to get the business back into the black.
v. blacked, black·ing, blacks
v.tr.
1. To make black: blacked their faces with charcoal.
2. To apply blacking to: blacked the stove.
3. Chiefly British To boycott as part of a labor union action.
v.intr.
To become black.
Phrasal Verb:
black out
1. To lose consciousness or memory temporarily: blacked out at the podium.
2. To suppress (a fact or memory, for example) from conscious recognition: blacked out many of my wartime experiences.
3. To cover or make illegible with black marking: The names in the document had been blacked out.
4. To prohibit the dissemination of, especially by censorship: blacked out the news issuing from the rebel provinces.
5. To extinguish or conceal all lights that might help enemy aircraft find a target during an air raid.
6. To extinguish all the lights on (a stage).
7. To cause a failure of electrical power in: Storm damage blacked out much of the region.
8. To suppress the broadcast of (an event or program) from an area: blacked out the football game on local TV stations.

[Middle English blak, from Old English blæc; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

black′ish adj.
black′ly adv.
black′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.black out - obliterate or extinguishblack out - obliterate or extinguish; "Some life-forms were obliterated by the radiation, others survived"
blow out, extinguish, quench, snuff out - put out, as of fires, flames, or lights; "Too big to be extinguished at once, the forest fires at best could be contained"; "quench the flames"; "snuff out the candles"
2.black out - darken completelyblack out - darken completely; "The dining room blackened out"
darken - become dark or darker; "The sky darkened"
3.black out - suppress by censorship as for political reasonsblack out - suppress by censorship as for political reasons; "parts of the newspaper article were blacked out"
edit, redact - prepare for publication or presentation by correcting, revising, or adapting; "Edit a book on lexical semantics"; "she edited the letters of the politician so as to omit the most personal passages"
4.black out - lose consciousness due to a sudden trauma, for exampleblack out - lose consciousness due to a sudden trauma, for example
faint, pass out, swoon, conk - pass out from weakness, physical or emotional distress due to a loss of blood supply to the brain
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"

black

adjective
1. Of the darkest achromatic visual value:
2. Having little or no light:
3. Covered or stained with or as if with dirt or other impurities:
4. Morally objectionable:
6. Characterized by intense ill will or spite:
Slang: bitchy.
verbphrasal verb
black out
1. To suffer temporary lack of consciousness:
2. To keep from being published or transmitted:
Translations
يَفْقِدُ الوَعْي
ztratit vědomí
besvimemiste bevidstheden
elveszti az eszméletét
rotast, missa meîvitund
stratiť vedomie
bayılmakkendinden geçmek

w>black out

vt sep
building, stage, windowverdunkeln
(= not broadcast) the technicians have blacked out tonight’s programmes (Brit) or programs (US) → durch einen Streik des technischen Personals kann das heutige Abendprogramm nicht ausgestrahlt werden
(with ink, paint) → schwärzen

black

(blӕk) adjective
1. of the colour in which these words are printed. black paint.
2. without light. a black night; The night was black and starless.
3. dirty. Your hands are black!; black hands from lifting coal.
4. without milk. black coffee.
5. evil. black magic.
6. (often offensive. currently acceptable in the United States, South Africa etc) Negro, of African, West Indian descent.
7. (especially South Africa) coloured; of mixed descent (increasingly used by people of mixed descent to refer to themselves).
noun
1. the colour in which these words are printed. Black and white are opposites.
2. something (eg paint) black in colour. I've used up all the black.
3. (often with capital. often offensive: currently acceptable in the United states, South Africa etc) a Negro; a person of African, West Indian etc descent.
verb
to make black.
ˈblackness noun
ˈblacken verb
1. to make or become black. The sky blackened before the storm.
2. to make to seem bad. She blackened his character.
3. to clean with black polish. He blackened his boots.
black art/magic
magic performed for evil reasons. He tries to practise black magic.
ˈblackbird noun
a dark-coloured bird of the thrush family.
ˈblackboard noun
a dark-coloured board for writing on in chalk (used especially in schools).
black box
a built-in machine for automatic recording of the details of a plane's flight. They found the black box two miles away from the wreckage of the crashed plane.
the Black Death noun
the plague that killed large numbers of people in Europe in the 14th to 18th centuries.
black eye
an eye with bad bruising around it (eg from a punch). George gave me a black eye.
ˈblackhead noun
a small black-topped lump in a pore of the skin, especially of the face.
ˈblacklist noun
a list of people who are out of favour etc.
verb
to put (a person etc) on such a list.
ˈblackmail verb
to obtain money illegally from (a person), usually by threatening to make known something which the victim wants to keep secret.
noun
the act of blackmailing. money got by blackmail.
ˈblackmailer noun
Black Maria (məˈraiə)
a prison van. The policeman took the three suspects to the police station in a Black Maria.
black market
(a place for) the illegal buying and selling, at high prices, of goods that are scarce, rationed etc. coffee on the black market.
black marketeer
a person who sells goods on the black market.
ˈblackout noun
1. a period of darkness produced by putting out all lights. Accidents increase during a blackout.
2. a ban (on news etc). a blackout of news about the coup.
3. a period of unconsciousness. He has had several blackouts during his illness.
4. a brief, temporary loss of memory, as when an actor forgets his/her lines.
5. (also outage) a period of a general power failure.
6. (in the theatre) the putting out of the stage lights at the end of a scene etc.
black sheep
a member of a family or group who is unsatisfactory in some way. My brother is the black sheep of the family.
ˈblacksmith noun
a person who makes and repairs by hand things made of iron. The blacksmith made a new shoe for the horse.
black and blue
badly bruised. After the fight the boy was all black and blue.
black out
to lose consciousness. He blacked out for almost a minute.
in black and white
in writing or print. Would you put that down in black and white?
References in periodicals archive ?
Fittings include fabrics and black outs, Home Automation, and Tubular Motors for Roller Shade Systems.
The business leader said that the holy month of Ramzan is coming closer and people have become concerned about the preparation of predawn meals amid frequent black outs.
The existing grid has already prevented over 1,000 black outs since launching in 2009, H.
He added that the GCC grid had prevented over 1,072 incidents of power black outs since 2009, through direct instantaneous transfer of required power across the grid, thus avoiding losses that could have been triggered due to full and partial interruptions.