black section

black section

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain in the 1980s) an unofficial group within the Labour Party in any constituency that represented the interests of local Black people
References in periodicals archive ?
But the play is set 30 years before that--in a lower-middle-class black section of Pittsburgh in the mid-1950s--and when you watch it now, in the impassioned screen version directed by its star, Denzel Washington, it feels like you're seeing a work from a distant time.
These were the chestnut Section B Hilin Primadonna from Dewi Evans of Pentrefoelas, and the black Section A Telynau Black Swan from David Jones and Geraint Thomas of Llanwnda, Caernarfon.
In 1955, buses were segregated in the US, a black woman in Montgomery Alabama by the name of Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat in the black section of the bus to a white person, as she was required to do so by law.
Had I lived a few miles away, in the majority black section of Chicago, the story would have been different.
Also, the belt line that separates the lower black section from the body panel has been heightened to give the car a wider and more aggressive look from the rear.
While teaching at Harvard and preaching at a church in Roxbury, a black section of Boston, Pinn recalls a nearby playground that came to represent for him decay and the numerous challenges faced by poor African Americans.
or power - salute to the packed black section of the public gallery.
Jude's Field, a muddy patch of land in the black section of Montgomery.
Preservation efforts for the graves began after several markers and headstones were destroyed when fans at a UNC-Clemson game parked their cars in the Black section of the cemetery in 1985.
Everyone knew what she was really guilty of--refusing to sit in the black section of a segregated cinema--but it took 64 years for the town of New Glasgow to pardon Desmond.