black-necked stilt


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Related to black-necked stilt: Wilson's phalarope, spotted sandpiper, greater yellowlegs, lesser yellowlegs
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Noun1.black-necked stilt - stilt of southwestern United States to northern South America having black plumage extending from the head down the back of the neckblack-necked stilt - stilt of southwestern United States to northern South America having black plumage extending from the head down the back of the neck
genus Himantopus, Himantopus - major one of two genera of stilts; similar to avocets but with straight bills
Himantopus stilt, longlegs, long-legs, stilt plover, stiltbird, stilt - long-legged three-toed black-and-white wading bird of inland ponds and marshes or brackish lagoons
References in periodicals archive ?
The Shorebird guild (12 species) included sandpipers (Scolopacidae, 8 species) as well as Double-striped Thickknee (Burhinus bistriatus), Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris), Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Wattled Jacana (Jacana jacana).
Puohala Marsh is the largest of the wetland habitats in the Pearl Harbor area and is also home to two rare species of birds, the Hawaiian black-necked stilt and the Hawaiian coot.
It's feeding time at the Aquarium of the Pacific's Shorebird Sanctuary, and Oscar, a black-necked stilt, is scrambling after a mealworm wedged in an old wooden log.
Bird life is abundant, and the fishponds are essential for protecting the habitat of such endangered species as the Hawaiian black-necked stilt and the Hawaiian coot, both endemic to the Big Island.
Nesting was uncommon even among resident species but was documented (nests and/or young) for Killdeer, Pied-billed Grebe, Least Grebe, Black-necked Stilt and Mottled Duck.
The McAllen International Airport is near the McAllen Marsh, a retired wastewater holding pond where one can see the least grebe (Tachybaptus dominicus) and black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), as well as other valley specialties.
Among shorebirds, the longevity records were 5 years for Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), 6 years for Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius), and 4 years for Wilson's Plover (Charadrius wilsonia); however, our recapture rate for these species was low and we suspect that our longevity estimates, especially for the resident Wilson's Plover, may be substantially lower than actual longevity.
The lower river near Long Beach features significant migrant species, including the western sandpiper, least sandpiper, black-necked stilt, long-billed dowitcher, semipalmated plover and black-bellied plover.
Black-necked stilts are beginning to colonize Fern Ridge Lake.
Family groups of black-necked stilts chatter, the calm water reflecting their long red legs and black-and-white bodies.