blackbirder


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blackbirder

(ˈblækˌbɜːdə)
n
a person or vessel involved in the capture and transportation of slaves
References in classic literature ?
When I was wrecked in the Solomons on the blackbirder, the Minota, it was Captain Kellar, master of the blackbirder, the Eugenie, who rescued me.
I was mate, then, on the Duchess, a whacking big one-hundred-and fifty-ton schooner, a blackbirder.
And how fared Captain Bateman of the blackbirder Nari?
In this volume, first published in 1954, the late Bulpin, an author, relates the experiences of Cecil Bernard "Bvekenya" (1886-1962) as a hunter, ivory poacher, blackbirder, outdoorsman, and conservationist.
The book's high points lay in its illumination of new material, drawn from various archives, the inclusion of period illustrations, and the presentation of compelling narratives (especially chapter three's focus on the most notorious blackbirder William "Bully" Hayes, and chapter five's investigation of the rise of the Ku Klux Klan in Fiji).
The Blackbirder, by James Nelson (Corgi Paperback, pounds 5.
Blackbirders and recruiters introduced islanders to a wider world.
The New York governor signed off on the request, which authorized fugitive-slave hunters known as blackbirders to capture Lee.
Then he stumbles across the deadly and dirty work of Blackbirders (slave catchers) - men who will stop at nothing to get their slaves back once again.
The final blow to the islanders came in the middle of the nineteenth century, when Chilean blackbirders carried away many hundreds of islanders to the guano mines in Chile, and few returned.
Official documents and less verifiable sources suggest that blackbirders were assisted by complacent colonial officials and complicit pastoralists, many of whom were signed up as Justices of the Peace and thus able to witness the workers' contracts (collated in Wright and Stella 2003).