blackmail


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to blackmail: Emotional Blackmail

black·mail

 (blăk′māl′)
n.
1.
a. Extortion of money or something else of value from a person by the threat of exposing a criminal act or discreditable information.
b. Something of value, especially money, extorted in this manner: refused to pay blackmail.
2. Tribute formerly paid to freebooters along the Scottish border for protection from pillage.

[black + mail.]

black′mail′ v.
black′mail′er n.

blackmail

(ˈblækˌmeɪl)
n
1. (Law) the act of attempting to obtain money by intimidation, as by threats to disclose discreditable information
2. the exertion of pressure or threats, esp unfairly, in an attempt to influence someone's actions
vb (tr)
3. (Law) to exact or attempt to exact (money or anything of value) from (a person) by threats or intimidation; extort
4. to attempt to influence the actions of (a person), esp by unfair pressure or threats
[C16: see black, mail3]
ˈblackmailer n

black•mail

(ˈblækˌmeɪl)
n.
1. a payment extorted by intimidation, as by threats of prosecution or injurious revelations.
2. the extortion of such payment.
3. a tribute formerly exacted in the north of England and in Scotland by freebooting chiefs for protection from pillage.
v.t.
4. to subject to blackmail.
[1545–55]
black′mail`er, n.

blackmail

- The "mail" in blackmail is Scottish for "tax, tribute," referring to the tribute demanded by rebel chiefs in return for their protection.
See also related terms for mail.

blackmail


Past participle: blackmailed
Gerund: blackmailing

Imperative
blackmail
blackmail
Present
I blackmail
you blackmail
he/she/it blackmails
we blackmail
you blackmail
they blackmail
Preterite
I blackmailed
you blackmailed
he/she/it blackmailed
we blackmailed
you blackmailed
they blackmailed
Present Continuous
I am blackmailing
you are blackmailing
he/she/it is blackmailing
we are blackmailing
you are blackmailing
they are blackmailing
Present Perfect
I have blackmailed
you have blackmailed
he/she/it has blackmailed
we have blackmailed
you have blackmailed
they have blackmailed
Past Continuous
I was blackmailing
you were blackmailing
he/she/it was blackmailing
we were blackmailing
you were blackmailing
they were blackmailing
Past Perfect
I had blackmailed
you had blackmailed
he/she/it had blackmailed
we had blackmailed
you had blackmailed
they had blackmailed
Future
I will blackmail
you will blackmail
he/she/it will blackmail
we will blackmail
you will blackmail
they will blackmail
Future Perfect
I will have blackmailed
you will have blackmailed
he/she/it will have blackmailed
we will have blackmailed
you will have blackmailed
they will have blackmailed
Future Continuous
I will be blackmailing
you will be blackmailing
he/she/it will be blackmailing
we will be blackmailing
you will be blackmailing
they will be blackmailing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been blackmailing
you have been blackmailing
he/she/it has been blackmailing
we have been blackmailing
you have been blackmailing
they have been blackmailing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been blackmailing
you will have been blackmailing
he/she/it will have been blackmailing
we will have been blackmailing
you will have been blackmailing
they will have been blackmailing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been blackmailing
you had been blackmailing
he/she/it had been blackmailing
we had been blackmailing
you had been blackmailing
they had been blackmailing
Conditional
I would blackmail
you would blackmail
he/she/it would blackmail
we would blackmail
you would blackmail
they would blackmail
Past Conditional
I would have blackmailed
you would have blackmailed
he/she/it would have blackmailed
we would have blackmailed
you would have blackmailed
they would have blackmailed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blackmail - extortion of money by threats to divulge discrediting informationblackmail - extortion of money by threats to divulge discrediting information
extortion - the felonious act of extorting money (as by threats of violence)
Verb1.blackmail - exert pressure on someone through threats
act upon, influence, work - have and exert influence or effect; "The artist's work influenced the young painter"; "She worked on her friends to support the political candidate"
2.blackmail - obtain through threats
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
extort - obtain through intimidation

blackmail

noun
1. threat, intimidation, ransom, compulsion, protection (informal), coercion, extortion, pay-off (informal), shakedown, hush money (slang), exaction It looks like the pictures were being used for blackmail.
verb
1. threaten, force, squeeze, compel, exact, intimidate, wring, coerce, milk, wrest, dragoon, extort, bleed (informal), press-gang, hold to ransom I thought he was trying to blackmail me into saying whatever he wanted.
Translations
vydíratvydírání
afpresningafpresse
kiristääkiristys
ucjenaucjenjivatiucijeniti
zsarolzsarolásmegzsarol
fjárkúgafjárkúgun
恐喝恐喝する
협박협박하다
şantajşantaja
vydieranievydierať
izsiljevanjeizsiljevati
utpressautpressning
การขู่ว่าจะเปิดโปงความลับหักหลัง
sự tống tiềntống tiền

blackmail

[ˈblækmeɪl]
A. Nchantaje m
it's sheer blackmail!¡es un chantaje!
B. VTchantajear
to blackmail sb into doing sthchantajear a algn para que haga algo
he was blackmailed into itlo hizo obligado por el chantaje

blackmail

[ˈblækmeɪl]
nchantage m
That's blackmail! → C'est du chantage!
vtfaire chanter
He blackmailed her → Il l'a fait chanter.
to blackmail sb into doing sth → forcer qn par le chantage à faire qch, faire chanter qn pour qu'il fasse qch

blackmail

[ˈblækmeɪl]
1. nricatto
2. vtricattare
to blackmail sb into doing sth → ricattare qn affinché faccia qc
3. adj (letter, phone call) → ricattatorio/a; (attempt) → di ricatto

black

(blӕk) adjective
1. of the colour in which these words are printed. black paint.
2. without light. a black night; The night was black and starless.
3. dirty. Your hands are black!; black hands from lifting coal.
4. without milk. black coffee.
5. evil. black magic.
6. (often offensive. currently acceptable in the United States, South Africa etc) Negro, of African, West Indian descent.
7. (especially South Africa) coloured; of mixed descent (increasingly used by people of mixed descent to refer to themselves).
noun
1. the colour in which these words are printed. Black and white are opposites.
2. something (eg paint) black in colour. I've used up all the black.
3. (often with capital. often offensive: currently acceptable in the United states, South Africa etc) a Negro; a person of African, West Indian etc descent.
verb
to make black.
ˈblackness noun
ˈblacken verb
1. to make or become black. The sky blackened before the storm.
2. to make to seem bad. She blackened his character.
3. to clean with black polish. He blackened his boots.
black art/magic
magic performed for evil reasons. He tries to practise black magic.
ˈblackbird noun
a dark-coloured bird of the thrush family.
ˈblackboard noun
a dark-coloured board for writing on in chalk (used especially in schools).
black box
a built-in machine for automatic recording of the details of a plane's flight. They found the black box two miles away from the wreckage of the crashed plane.
the Black Death noun
the plague that killed large numbers of people in Europe in the 14th to 18th centuries.
black eye
an eye with bad bruising around it (eg from a punch). George gave me a black eye.
ˈblackhead noun
a small black-topped lump in a pore of the skin, especially of the face.
ˈblacklist noun
a list of people who are out of favour etc.
verb
to put (a person etc) on such a list.
ˈblackmail verb
to obtain money illegally from (a person), usually by threatening to make known something which the victim wants to keep secret.
noun
the act of blackmailing. money got by blackmail.
ˈblackmailer noun
Black Maria (məˈraiə)
a prison van. The policeman took the three suspects to the police station in a Black Maria.
black market
(a place for) the illegal buying and selling, at high prices, of goods that are scarce, rationed etc. coffee on the black market.
black marketeer
a person who sells goods on the black market.
ˈblackout noun
1. a period of darkness produced by putting out all lights. Accidents increase during a blackout.
2. a ban (on news etc). a blackout of news about the coup.
3. a period of unconsciousness. He has had several blackouts during his illness.
4. a brief, temporary loss of memory, as when an actor forgets his/her lines.
5. (also outage) a period of a general power failure.
6. (in the theatre) the putting out of the stage lights at the end of a scene etc.
black sheep
a member of a family or group who is unsatisfactory in some way. My brother is the black sheep of the family.
ˈblacksmith noun
a person who makes and repairs by hand things made of iron. The blacksmith made a new shoe for the horse.
black and blue
badly bruised. After the fight the boy was all black and blue.
black out
to lose consciousness. He blacked out for almost a minute.
in black and white
in writing or print. Would you put that down in black and white?

blackmail

اِبْتِزاز, يَبْتَزُّ بالتَّهْدِيد vydírání, vydírat afpresning, afpresse erpressen, Erpressung εκβιάζω, εκβιασμός chantaje, chantajear kiristää, kiristys chantage, faire chanter ucjena, ucjenjivati ricattare, ricatto 恐喝, 恐喝する 협박, 협박하다 chantage, chanteren utpresse, utpressing szantaż, zaszantażować chantagear, chantagem шантаж, шантажировать utpressa, utpressning การขู่ว่าจะเปิดโปงความลับ, หักหลัง şantaj, şantaj yapmak sự tống tiền, tống tiền 勒索
References in classic literature ?
After breakfast Jurgis was driven to the court, which was crowded with the prisoners and those who had come out of curiosity or in the hope of recognizing one of the men and getting a case for blackmail.
He had collected blackmail from two or three hundred people already, that day, but had not chipped out ice enough to impair the glacier perceptibly.
Then he got up in the world and became an Obi-man, which gives an opportunity to wealth VIA blackmail.
For the whole air was dense with the morbidity of blackmail, which is the most morbid of human things, because it is a crime concealing a crime; a black plaster on a blacker wound.
You would practically blackmail the father of the girl you love?
Bullying him] How dare you come here and attempt to blackmail me?
This gentleman, who collected fine editions and was a patron of literature, paid blackmail to a heavy-jowled, black- browed boss of a municipal machine.
What do you mean by coming here and trying to blackmail me?
Lord Amber went into wild society in a sort of chivalry; now he's paying blackmail to the lowest vultures in London.
Not for the first time, he was threatened with blackmail.
Perhaps a thought of blackmail occurred to him as a useful possibility in helping him in his designs on Mademoiselle Stangerson.
If I didn't there'd be the very devil to pay in blackmail.