blacksmith

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Related to blacksmithing: Bladesmithing

black·smith

 (blăk′smĭth′)
n.
1. One that forges and shapes iron with an anvil and hammer.
2. One that makes, repairs, and fits horseshoes.

[From the color of iron.]

black′smith′ing n.

blacksmith

(ˈblækˌsmɪθ)
n
(Metallurgy) an artisan who works iron with a furnace, anvil, hammer, etc
[C14: see black, smith]

black•smith

(ˈblækˌsmɪθ)

n.
1. a person who makes horseshoes and shoes horses.
2. a person who forges objects of iron.
[1250–1300]
black′smith`ing, n.

Blacksmith

One who works in iron and repairs iron implements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Blacksmith - a smith who forges and shapes iron with a hammer and anvilblacksmith - a smith who forges and shapes iron with a hammer and anvil
farrier, horseshoer - a person who shoes horses
metalworker, smith - someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable)
Translations
حَدّاد
kovář
grovsmed
hevosenkengittäjäseppä
kovačkovačica
patkolókovács
járnsmiîur
鍛冶屋
kovač

blacksmith

[ˈblæksmɪθ] Nherrero/a m/f
blacksmith's (forge)herrería f

blacksmith

[ˈblæksmɪθ] nforgeron mblack spot n
(on road)point m noir
(= bad area for sth) → point m noirblack-tie black tie
adj [dinner, function] → en tenue de soirée, habillé(e)
n
to wear black tie → porter un smoking

blacksmith

[ˈblækˌsmɪθ] nfabbro ferraio

black

(blӕk) adjective
1. of the colour in which these words are printed. black paint.
2. without light. a black night; The night was black and starless.
3. dirty. Your hands are black!; black hands from lifting coal.
4. without milk. black coffee.
5. evil. black magic.
6. (often offensive. currently acceptable in the United States, South Africa etc) Negro, of African, West Indian descent.
7. (especially South Africa) coloured; of mixed descent (increasingly used by people of mixed descent to refer to themselves).
noun
1. the colour in which these words are printed. Black and white are opposites.
2. something (eg paint) black in colour. I've used up all the black.
3. (often with capital. often offensive: currently acceptable in the United states, South Africa etc) a Negro; a person of African, West Indian etc descent.
verb
to make black.
ˈblackness noun
ˈblacken verb
1. to make or become black. The sky blackened before the storm.
2. to make to seem bad. She blackened his character.
3. to clean with black polish. He blackened his boots.
black art/magic
magic performed for evil reasons. He tries to practise black magic.
ˈblackbird noun
a dark-coloured bird of the thrush family.
ˈblackboard noun
a dark-coloured board for writing on in chalk (used especially in schools).
black box
a built-in machine for automatic recording of the details of a plane's flight. They found the black box two miles away from the wreckage of the crashed plane.
the Black Death noun
the plague that killed large numbers of people in Europe in the 14th to 18th centuries.
black eye
an eye with bad bruising around it (eg from a punch). George gave me a black eye.
ˈblackhead noun
a small black-topped lump in a pore of the skin, especially of the face.
ˈblacklist noun
a list of people who are out of favour etc.
verb
to put (a person etc) on such a list.
ˈblackmail verb
to obtain money illegally from (a person), usually by threatening to make known something which the victim wants to keep secret.
noun
the act of blackmailing. money got by blackmail.
ˈblackmailer noun
Black Maria (məˈraiə)
a prison van. The policeman took the three suspects to the police station in a Black Maria.
black market
(a place for) the illegal buying and selling, at high prices, of goods that are scarce, rationed etc. coffee on the black market.
black marketeer
a person who sells goods on the black market.
ˈblackout noun
1. a period of darkness produced by putting out all lights. Accidents increase during a blackout.
2. a ban (on news etc). a blackout of news about the coup.
3. a period of unconsciousness. He has had several blackouts during his illness.
4. a brief, temporary loss of memory, as when an actor forgets his/her lines.
5. (also outage) a period of a general power failure.
6. (in the theatre) the putting out of the stage lights at the end of a scene etc.
black sheep
a member of a family or group who is unsatisfactory in some way. My brother is the black sheep of the family.
ˈblacksmith noun
a person who makes and repairs by hand things made of iron. The blacksmith made a new shoe for the horse.
black and blue
badly bruised. After the fight the boy was all black and blue.
black out
to lose consciousness. He blacked out for almost a minute.
in black and white
in writing or print. Would you put that down in black and white?
References in classic literature ?
The shoemaking and mending, the blacksmithing, cartwrighting, coopering, weaving, and grain-grind- ing, were all performed by the slaves on the home plantation.
All of the work for the building, such as brickmaking, brick-masonry, carpentry, blacksmithing, etc.
But no matter how peculiarly constituted a man may be for blacksmithing," she was laughing, "I never heard of one becoming a blacksmith without first serving his apprenticeship.
Visitors were treated to a number of attractions including birds of prey demonstrations, green wood-working, blacksmithing and chainsaw carving.
The course will give people a chance to learn the basics of blacksmithing.
FAMILIES can be at one with nature and try out traditional activities including blacksmithing and wood turning at a special event.
com)-- A Benefit for the Banton-Smith Center for Blacksmith and Metal Arts at Grayhaven Winery in Gum Spring, VA: On Saturday, May 16th, the Central Virginia Blacksmith Guild in conjunction with Grayhaven Winery will be hosting a festival dedicated to blacksmithing and wine tasting.
These skills range from stonemasonry and blacksmithing to wooden window making and lime pointing.
I've got a background in fine art, sculpture and blacksmithing, so it wasn't a total leap in the dark.
It is interesting to note that blacksmithing and iron are common themes in the Kurdish and Turkish versions of the Nevruz legends, as according to the Ergenekon epic, the first Turks were able to leave their hidden valley by melting down the huge iron mass blocking their way out.
Throughout the winter, Old Sturbridge Village artisans in 1830s-style costumes demonstrate the chores and crafts so important to everyday life in early New England: blacksmithing, "tinning,'' printing, pottery-making, shoe-making, farm work and cooking by the fireside.