blackwater


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black·wa·ter

 (blăk′wô′tər, -wăt′ər)
n.
1. Wastewater containing bodily or other biological wastes, as from toilets, dishwashers, or kitchen drains, and kept separate from graywater in wastewater recycling systems.
2. Water, as in a river or swamp, that has absorbed tannins from decaying vegetation, acquiring a dark brown color.

blackwater

(ˈblækˌwɔːtə)
n
1. a stream stained dark with peat
2. a disease of cows and sheep
3. Indian the sea

black•wa•ter

(ˈblækˌwɔ tər, -ˈwɒt ər)

n.
1. any of several diseases characterized by the production of dark urine as a result of the rapid breakdown of red blood cells.
[1790–1800]

black·wa·ter

(blăk′wô′tər)
Wastewater from flushed toilets. See Note at graywater.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blackwater - any of several human or animal diseases characterized by dark urine resulting from rapid breakdown of red blood cells
disease - an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Close inshore was a multitude of fishing smacks--English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish; steam launches from the Thames, yachts, electric boats; and beyond were ships of large burden, a multitude of filthy colliers, trim merchantmen, cattle ships, passenger boats, petroleum tanks, ocean tramps, an old white transport even, neat white and grey liners from Southampton and Hamburg; and along the blue coast across the Blackwater my brother could make out dimly a dense swarm of boats chaffering with the people on the beach, a swarm which also extended up the Blackwater almost to Maldon.
There were already a couple of score of passengers aboard, some of whom had expended their last money in securing a passage, but the captain lay off the Blackwater until five in the afternoon, picking up passengers until the seated decks were even dangerously crowded.
Lord Leverstoke, the Earl of Blackwater, Sir Cathcart Soames--they all have intrusted their sons to me.
One of my Polynesian sailors lay at death's door with blackwater fever.
They come back, accompanied by Count Fosco and his wife, who propose to settle somewhere in the neighbourhood of London, and who have engaged to stay at Blackwater Park for the summer months before deciding on a place of residence.
Meanwhile, here I am, established at Blackwater Park, "the ancient and interesting seat" (as the county history obligingly informs me) "of Sir Percival Glyde, Bart.
He has spent so much money abroad that he has none left to defray the expenses of living in London for the remainder of the season, and he is economically resolved to pass the summer and autumn quietly at Blackwater.
Last night I slept in London, and was delayed there so long to-day by various calls and commissions, that I did not reach Blackwater this evening till after dusk.
I have not seen one of them yet, and I know nothing about the house, except that one wing of it is said to be five hundred years old, that it had a moat round it once, and that it gets its name of Blackwater from a lake in the park.
I wonder how Blackwater Park will look in the daytime?
We went next to the wing on the right, which was built, by way of completing the wonderful architectural jumble at Blackwater Park, in the time of George the Second.
I was terribly afraid, from what I had heard of Blackwater Park, of fatiguing antique chairs, and dismal stained glass, and musty, frouzy hangings, and all the barbarous lumber which people born without a sense of comfort accumulate about them, in defiance of the consideration due to the convenience of their friends.