blackwood

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Black·wood

 (blăk′wo͝od′), William 1776-1834.
British publisher and editor (1817-1834) of Blackwood's Magazine, a Tory literary review that published Wordsworth and Shelley among others.

blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: Sally Wattle a tall Australian acacia tree, A. melanoxylon, having small clusters of flowers and curved pods and yielding highly valued black timber
2. (Plants) any of various trees or shrubs of the leguminous genus Dalbergia, esp D. melanoxylon (of Africa) or D. latifolia (of India), yielding black wood used for carving and musical instruments
3. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees

Blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
(Bridge) bridge a conventional bidding sequence of four and five no-trumps, which are requests to the partner to show aces and kings respectively
[C20: named after Easeley F. Blackwood, its American inventor]

Blackwood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)
n
(Biography) Algernon (Henry). 1869–1951, British novelist and short-story writer; noted for his supernatural tales

Black•wood

(ˈblækˌwʊd)

n.
William, 1776–1834, English publisher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blackwood - very dark wood of any of several blackwood trees
blackwood tree, blackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored wood
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.Blackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored woodblackwood - any of several hardwood trees yielding very dark-colored wood
Acacia melanoxylon, lightwood - tall Australian acacia yielding highly valued black timber
campeachy, Haematoxylum campechianum, logwood tree, bloodwood tree, logwood - spiny shrub or small tree of Central America and West Indies having bipinnate leaves and racemes of small bright yellow flowers and yielding a hard brown or brownish-red heartwood used in preparing a black dye
blackwood - very dark wood of any of several blackwood trees
Avicennia marina, black mangrove - a mangrove of the West Indies and the southern Florida coast; occurs in dense thickets and has numerous short roots that bend up from the ground
tree - a tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms
References in periodicals archive ?
Tower of the Arkein, his latest book, was released on May 8th, 2017, just days after Chase Blackwoods most recent set of military orders.
Fortescue would like to thank local businesses Blackwoods, Coates Hire Karratha, Diverse Group Wickham, Hanson Construction Materials, Hertz Karratha, Home Hardware, Northwest Sand & Gravel, Northwest Tree Services, Morris, Scarboro Painting NW, A&P Transport, Toxfree Australia, and Thiess as well as Mingullatharndo Community, The Ngarluma Yindjibarndi Foundation and Wirlu-murra Yindjibarndi Aboriginal Corporation for their generous support of the working bee.
The Blackwoods and McCastlain will receive the award at 2p.
Stay there: Blackwoods Campground is the only one of Acadia's three which is open year-round.
With a structured development, I see the Bravos, the Blackwoods, the Brathwaites, the Bishoos and all the guys making an impact.
21) EBB first mentions the works of Swedenborg in a letter to Mary Russell Mitford dated 1840, four years before the publication of her first foray into social-problem poems with "The Cry of the Children," which was published in Blackwoods in 1842, and later with "The Cry of the Human" in her 1844 collection Poems.
Writers discussed include Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker, and Algernon Blackwoods, with one chapter devoted to analysis of political and social themes in Jane LoudonEs The Mummy.
Compiled and edited by Mike Ashley for the Stark House Supernatural Classics series, "The Face Of The Earth And Other Imaginings" is a 222 page anthology showcasing thirty examples of Blackwoods short story mastery of the supernatural genre.
In 1989, Blackwoods Beverages in Winnipeg bought the bottling plants (including Starlite) in western Canada, which were then amalgamated into PCCB (West) Ltd.
I wondered whether the more capacious "modernity" might more aptly delimit the temporal claims that are explored here than does "modernism," and whether Romanticists or Victorianists might not feel that the autonomizing forces of Blackwoods, the Cornhill, or the Germ are given too short shrift.