blamable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to blamable: blameful, blameworthy

blame

 (blām)
tr.v. blamed, blam·ing, blames
1. To consider responsible for a misdeed, failure, or undesirable outcome: blamed the coach for the loss; blamed alcohol for his bad behavior.
2. To find fault with; criticize: I can't blame you for wanting your fair share.
3. To place responsibility for (something): blamed the crisis on poor planning.
n.
1. The state of being responsible for a fault or error; culpability.
2. Censure; condemnation: "Hoover hazarded more in the way of federal response to economic crisis than any president before him, but his efforts were not enough to divert the blame and wrath of the American people" (Michael B. Stoff).
Idiom:
to blame
1. Deserving censure or disapproval; at fault: an investigation to determine who was to blame for the leak.
2. Being the cause or source of something: A freak storm was to blame for the power outage.

[Middle English blamen, from Old French blasmer, blamer, from Vulgar Latin *blastēmāre, alteration of Late Latin blasphēmāre, to reproach; see blaspheme.]

blam′a·ble, blame′a·ble adj.
blam′a·bly, blame′a·bly adv.
blam′er n.
Synonyms: blame, fault, guilt
These nouns denote responsibility for an offense or error. Blame stresses the assignment of accountability and often connotes censure or criticism: The police laid the blame for the accident on the driver.
Fault suggests a failure or deficiency on the part of the responsible party: It's my own fault that I wasn't prepared for the exam.
Guilt applies to willful wrongdoing and stresses moral or legal transgression: The prosecution had evidence of the defendant's guilt.

blam•a•ble

or blame•a•ble

(ˈbleɪ mə bəl)

adj.
deserving blame; censurable.
[1350–1400]
blam′a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.blamable - deserving blame or censure as being wrong or evil or injuriousblamable - deserving blame or censure as being wrong or evil or injurious; "blameworthy if not criminal behavior"; "censurable misconduct"; "culpable negligence"
guilty - responsible for or chargeable with a reprehensible act; "guilty of murder"; "the guilty person"; "secret guilty deeds"

blamable

also blameable
adjective
Translations

blamable

[ˈbleɪməbl] ADJcensurable, culpable

blamable

[ˈbleɪməbl] adjbiasimevole
References in classic literature ?
He had been blamable, highly blamable, in remaining at Norland after he first felt her influence over him to be more than it ought to be.
You are aware that I am no way blamable in this matter.
She recalled the small details, the words, tones, and looks, in the critical scenes which had opened a new epoch for her by giving her a deeper insight into the relations and trials of life, or which had called on her for some little effort of forbearance, or of painful adherence to an imagined or real duty-- asking herself continually whether she had been in any respect blamable.
Upon the whole, there can be no room to doubt that the convention acted wisely in copying from the models of those constitutions which have established good behavior as the tenure of their judicial offices, in point of duration; and that so far from being blamable on this account, their plan would have been inexcusably defective, if it had wanted this important feature of good government.
Yet, listen; without being very blamable, a woman can excite a good deal of uneasiness.
Nor was he less blamable for the manner in which he constituted the ephori; for these magistrates take cognisance of things of the last importance, and yet they are chosen out of the people in general; so that it often happens that a very poor person is elected to that office, who, from that circumstance, is easily bought.
I would tell her that you have not been blamable before any one's judgment but your own.
One conclusion, however, I felt tolera bly sure that I had drawn correctly from what she said: her father's conduct toward her, though not absolutely blamable or grossly neglectful on any point, had still never been of a nature to make her ardently fond of him.
Like those saintly personages in whom religion does not stifle ambition, Elisabeth was capable of requiring others to do a blamable action that she might reap the fruits; and she would have been, like them again, implacable as to her dues and dissembling in her actions.