blandish


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Related to blandish: brumal

blan·dish

 (blăn′dĭsh)
tr.v. blan·dished, blan·dish·ing, blan·dish·es
To coax by flattery or wheedling; cajole.

[Middle English blandishen, from Old French blandir, blandiss-, from Latin blandīrī, from blandus, flattering; see mel-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

blan′dish·er n.
blan′dish·ment n.

blandish

(ˈblændɪʃ)
vb
(tr) to seek to persuade or influence by mild flattery; coax
[C14: from Old French blandir from Latin blandīrī]

blan•dish

(ˈblæn dɪʃ)
v.t.
1. to coax or influence by gentle flattery; cajole.
v.i.
2. to use flattery or cajolery.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French blandiss-, long s. of blandir < Latin blandīrī to soothe, flatter. See bland, -ish 2]
blan′dish•er, n.
blan′dish•ing•ly, adv.

blandish


Past participle: blandished
Gerund: blandishing

Imperative
blandish
blandish
Present
I blandish
you blandish
he/she/it blandishes
we blandish
you blandish
they blandish
Preterite
I blandished
you blandished
he/she/it blandished
we blandished
you blandished
they blandished
Present Continuous
I am blandishing
you are blandishing
he/she/it is blandishing
we are blandishing
you are blandishing
they are blandishing
Present Perfect
I have blandished
you have blandished
he/she/it has blandished
we have blandished
you have blandished
they have blandished
Past Continuous
I was blandishing
you were blandishing
he/she/it was blandishing
we were blandishing
you were blandishing
they were blandishing
Past Perfect
I had blandished
you had blandished
he/she/it had blandished
we had blandished
you had blandished
they had blandished
Future
I will blandish
you will blandish
he/she/it will blandish
we will blandish
you will blandish
they will blandish
Future Perfect
I will have blandished
you will have blandished
he/she/it will have blandished
we will have blandished
you will have blandished
they will have blandished
Future Continuous
I will be blandishing
you will be blandishing
he/she/it will be blandishing
we will be blandishing
you will be blandishing
they will be blandishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been blandishing
you have been blandishing
he/she/it has been blandishing
we have been blandishing
you have been blandishing
they have been blandishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been blandishing
you will have been blandishing
he/she/it will have been blandishing
we will have been blandishing
you will have been blandishing
they will have been blandishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been blandishing
you had been blandishing
he/she/it had been blandishing
we had been blandishing
you had been blandishing
they had been blandishing
Conditional
I would blandish
you would blandish
he/she/it would blandish
we would blandish
you would blandish
they would blandish
Past Conditional
I would have blandished
you would have blandished
he/she/it would have blandished
we would have blandished
you would have blandished
they would have blandished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.blandish - praise somewhat dishonestlyblandish - praise somewhat dishonestly    
soft-soap - use flattering talk on somebody
praise - express approval of; "The parents praised their children for their academic performance"
adulate - flatter in an obsequious manner
stroke - treat gingerly or carefully; "You have to stroke the boss"
bootlick, kotow, toady, truckle, kowtow, fawn, suck up - try to gain favor by cringing or flattering; "He is always kowtowing to his boss"
brown-nose, butter up - flatter with the intention of getting something

blandish

verb
1. To persuade or try to persuade by gentle persistent urging or flattery:
Informal: soft-soap, sweet-talk.
2. To compliment excessively and ingratiatingly:
Informal: soft-soap, sweet-talk.
Translations

blandish

[ˈblændɪʃ] VTengatusar, halagar

blandish

vtschönreden (+dat)
References in periodicals archive ?
In his essay Raes and Miss Blandish, Orwell wrote: "Cricket is not in reality a very popular game in England - it is nowhere so popular as football, for instance - but it gives expression to a well-marked trait in the English character, the tendency to value 'form' or 'style' more highly than success.
I saw each production several times - Summit Conference, No Orchids for Miss Blandish, Voltaire, Loot, Seven Deadly Sins of the Lower Middle Class and all the Chekhovs.
Notable translations such as James Hadley's No Orchids for Miss Blandish (published in France in 1946), a work that draws on Faulkner's Sanctuary, had an enormous impact in the development of roman noir.