bleating


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bleat

 (blēt)
n.
1.
a. The characteristic cry of a goat or sheep.
b. A sound similar to this cry.
2. A whining, feeble complaint.
v. bleat·ed, bleat·ing, bleats
v.intr.
1. To utter the characteristic cry of a goat or sheep.
2. To utter a sound similar to this cry, especially a whine.
v.tr.
To utter in a whining way.

[Middle English blet, from bleten, to bleat, from Old English blǣtan.]

bleat′er n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
And while she dreamed there came to her ears from a distance, faintly, the terrified bleating of a kid.
High on the rock stood a little Goat bleating and calling and beckoning to the Marionette to come to her.
Halpin was pretty generally deprecated as an intellectual black sheep who was likely at any moment to disgrace the flock by bleating in meter.
The cattle, bald in patches where the new hair had not grown yet, lowed in the pastures; the bowlegged lambs frisked round their bleating mothers.
All the sounds of man, the bleating of sheep, the cries of birds, the hum of insects, the stir that makes the background of our lives--all that was over.
He could hear the tattered man bleating plaintively.
It is a firstling of the flock," said Abel-Phittim, "I know him by the bleating of his lips, and the innocent folding of his limbs.
The lowing heifer and the bleating ewe, in herds and flocks, may ramble safe and unregarded through the pastures.
An't that as nat'ral as a sheep's bleating, or a pig's grunting, or a horse's neighing, or a bird's singing?
We could almost fancy we heard their voices and the bleating of their sheep and goats, but when the sun went down and it came on dark, we camped down upon the beach, and next morning I called a council.
But the clamour of the Trojan ranks was as that of many thousand ewes that stand waiting to be milked in the yards of some rich flockmaster, and bleat incessantly in answer to the bleating of their lambs; for they had not one speech nor language, but their tongues were diverse, and they came from many different places.
Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low grade, were mingled together in a mass; the whistling of drovers, the barking dogs, the bellowing and plunging of the oxen, the bleating of sheep, the grunting and squeaking of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping and yelling; the hideous and discordant dim that resounded from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figues constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng; rendered it a stunning and bewildering scene, which quite confounded the senses.