bleeding edge


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bleeding edge

n
a. the very forefront of technological development
b. (as modifier): bleeding-edge communications systems.

bleed′ing edge′


n.
the most advanced stage of a technology, art, etc., usu. experimental and risky.
[1980–85; patterned after cutting or leading edge]

bleeding edge

That edge of a map or chart on which cartographic detail is extended to the edge of the sheet.

bleeding edge

Technologies that are so advanced or innovative that there is no known application for them at present.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Proto will give these businesses the chance to explore the bleeding edge of technology, at a much lower entry cost point and without the commitment of purchasing equipment to trial.
Viptela's platform is bleeding edge technology," said Saad Waraich Chief Technology and Information Officer at PTCL, "but what also excites us is that it allows us to dramatically improve time to new services.
LIVERPOOL International Festival of Psychedelia is, according to its organisers, "a pancontinental celebration of audio-futurists, operating at the bleeding edge of today's psychedelic renaissance.
The company was founded in 2004 by John Montgomery, a multi-media artist and director who has been building brands at the bleeding edge of pop-culture for over a decade, and Scott Williamson, a former rocket scientist and true technology evangelist.
As a company that supports customers on the bleeding edge of the wireless connectivity and remote sensing technology curve, we are keenly aware of the increasingly critical role antennas will play in any mobile device solution, said Alex Iuorio, senior vice president, supplier management and business development for Avnet Electronics Marketing Americas.
Several chapters describe the bleeding edge of new technologies, such as brainstem implants, the effects of implants on music perception ad general health-related quality of life, advances in surgical techniques and sound processing.
In Bleeding Edge he offers two such spaces: twenty-first century Manhattan (of all places), where everything unique, quirky, and eccentric is being bludgeoned into conformity by an ideology of real-estate development; and the Deep Web, specifically a Second Life-type platform called DeepArcher, where hackers can escape our commodity-driven culture--for the moment.