blended


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blend

 (blĕnd)
v. blend·ed or blent (blĕnt), blend·ing, blends
v.tr.
1. To combine or mix (different substances) so that the constituent parts are indistinguishable from one another: blended the flour, milk, and eggs; blend gasoline with ethanol.
2. To combine (varieties or grades of the same substance) to obtain a mixture of a particular character, quality, or consistency: blend coffees.
3. To combine (different elements) into a single entity: a career that blends medicine and engineering. See Synonyms at mix.
v.intr.
1. To form a uniform mixture: "The smoke blended easily into the odor of the other fumes" (Norman Mailer).
2. To be unobtrusive or harmonious by resembling the surroundings or behaving like others in a group. Often used with in: a female pheasant is brown and blends in with its nesting ground.
3. To create a harmonious effect or result: picked a tie that blended with the jacket.
n.
1.
a. The act of blending: the writer's unique blend of fantasy and physics.
b. Something, such as an effect or a product, that is created by blending: "His face shows, as he stares at the fire, a blend of fastidiousness and intransigence" (John Fowles).
2. Linguistics A word produced by combining parts of other words, as smog from smoke and fog.

[Middle English blenden, probably from Old Norse blanda, blend-; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blended

(ˈblɛndɪd)
adj
made by commercially blending different varieties of the same thing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.blended - combined or mixed together so that the constituent parts are indistinguishableblended - combined or mixed together so that the constituent parts are indistinguishable
unblended - not blended or mixed together
Translations

blended

[ˈblendɪd] ADJmezclado

blended

adj blended whiskyBlended m
References in classic literature ?
The several departments of power are distributed and blended in such a manner as at once to destroy all symmetry and beauty of form, and to expose some of the essential parts of the edifice to the danger of being crushed by the disproportionate weight of other parts.
The constitution of New Jersey has blended the different powers of government more than any of the preceding.
There was little of that sort of customary thing where the tenor and the soprano stand down by the footlights, warbling, with blended voices, and keep holding out their arms toward each other and drawing them back and spreading both hands over first one breast and then the other with a shake and a pressure--no, it was every rioter for himself and no blending.
The leaf, in one particular stage, when nearly all the prismatic colours are blended on its surface, is often converted by the natives into a superb and striking bead-dress.
The trees are stripped of their nodding burdens, which, easily freed from the rind and core, are gathered together in capacious wooden vessels, where the pulpy fruit is soon worked by a stone pestle, vigorously applied, into a blended mass of a doughy consistency, called by the natives 'Tutao'.
A strain of melancholy, however, blended with his triumph, rendering his voice, as usual, soft and musical.
At length, however, the mournful notes of a whip-poor-will became blended with the moanings of an owl; his heavy eyes occasionally sought the bright rays of the stars, and he then fancied he saw them through the fallen lids.
They spoke together, and the sounds of their voices were low and solemn, as if influenced by a reverence that was deeply blended with awe.
Upon the whole, the consequences of such a law as this would be directly contrary to those things which good laws ought to establish, and which Socrates endeavoured to establish by his regulations concerning women and children: for we think that friendship is the greatest good which can happen to any city, as nothing so much prevents seditions: and amity in a city is what Socrates commends above all things, which appears to be, as indeed he says, the effect of friendship; as we learn from Aristophanes in the Erotics, who says, that those who love one another from the excess of that passion, desire to breathe the same soul, and from being two to be blended into one: from whence it would necessarily follow, that both or one of them must be destroyed.
With those organic beings which never intercross (if such exist), the species, on my theory, must have descended from a succession of improved varieties, which will never have blended with other individuals or varieties, but will have supplanted each other; so that, at each successive stage of modification and improvement, all the individuals of each variety will have descended from a single parent.
The offers of Middleton were promptly accepted, and, while the father looked forward impatiently to the day assigned for the nuptials, as to the pledge of his own success, the daughter thought of it with feelings in which the holy emotions of her faith were blended with the softer sensations of her years and situation.
There was so much of fervent piety, mingled with so strong a burst of natural feeling, so much of the woman blended with the angel, in her prayers, that Middleton could have forgiven her, had she termed him a Pagan, for the sweetness and interest with which she petitioned in his favour.