blew


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Related to blew: blew a fuse, blew off

blew 1

 (blo͞o)
v.
Past tense of blow1.

blew 2

 (blo͞o)
v.
Past tense of blow3.

blew

(bluː)
vb
the past tense of blow1

blow1

(bloʊ)

n.
1. a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon.
2. a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc.
3. a sudden attack or drastic action.
Idioms:
come to blows, to begin to fight, esp. physically.
[1425–75; late Middle English blaw, N form representing later blowe]

blow2

(bloʊ)

v. blew, blown or, for 24, blowed, blow•ing,
n. v.i.
1. (of the wind or air) to be in motion.
2. to move along, carried by or as if by the wind.
3. to produce or emit a current of air, as with the mouth or a bellows.
4. (of a horn, trumpet, etc.) to give out sound.
5. to make a blowing sound; whistle: The sirens blew at noon.
6. (of horses) to breathe hard or quickly; pant.
7. to boast; brag.
8. (of a whale) to spout.
9. (of a fuse, light bulb, tire, etc.) to stop functioning or be destroyed, as by bursting, exploding, or melting (often fol. by out).
10. Slang. to leave; depart.
v.t.
11. to drive by means of a current of air: A breeze blew dust into my eyes.
12. to drive a current of air upon.
13. to clear or empty by forcing air through: Try blowing your nose.
14. to shape (glass, smoke, etc.) with a current of air.
15. to cause to sound, as by a current of air: to blow a horn.
16. to cause to explode: A mine blew the ship to bits.
17. to cause or undergo the bursting, melting, burning, or disfunctioning of, as by strain or overload (often fol. by out): to blow a tire.
18. to cause to fall or collapse by a current of air; topple or demolish (usu. fol. by down, over, etc.): A windstorm blew down the tent.
19. to spread or make widely known: Growing panic blew the rumor about.
20. Informal.
a. to squander; spend quickly or extravagantly: I blew $100 on dinner.
b. to treat; bear the expense for: I'll blow you to a movie.
21. Informal.
a. to mishandle, ruin, or botch; bungle: You blew your last chance.
b. to waste or lose: The team blew the lead in the third quarter.
22. to damn: Blow the cost! Well, I'll be blowed!
23. to put (a horse) out of breath by fatigue.
24. Slang. to depart from: to blow town.
25. Vulgar Slang. to perform fellatio on.
26. blow away,
a. to kill, esp. by gunfire.
b. to defeat decisively; trounce.
c. to overwhelm with emotion, astonishment, etc.
27. blow in, to arrive at a place, esp. unexpectedly.
28. blow off, to disregard, ignore, or reject: He blew off their meeting.
29. blow out,
a. to extinguish or become extinguished.
b. to lose or cause to lose force or to cease: The storm has blown itself out.
c. (of an oil or gas well) to lose oil or gas uncontrollably.
30. blow over,
a. to pass away; subside: The storm blew over in minutes.
b. to be forgotten: The scandal will blow over eventually.
31. blow up,
a. to explode or cause to explode.
b. to exaggerate; enlarge.
c. to lose one's temper.
d. to fill with air or gas; inflate: to blow up a balloon.
e. to distend or become distended; swell.
f. to make an enlarged reproduction of (a photograph).
g. to come into being: A storm suddenly blew up.
n.
32. a blast of air or wind.
33. a violent windstorm.
34. an act of producing a blast of air, as in playing a wind instrument.
Idioms:
1. blow hot and cold, to favor and then reject something by turns; vacillate.
2. blow off steam, to reduce or release tension, as by loud talking.
3. blow one's cool, to lose one's composure.
4. blow one's cover, to divulge one's secret identity, esp. inadvertently.
5. blow one's mind, to overwhelm one, as with excitement, pleasure, or dismay.
6. blow one's stack or top, to become enraged; lose one's temper.
7. blow the lid off, to expose (scandal or illegal actions) to public view.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English blāwan; c. Old High German blā(h)an, Latin flāre to blow]

blow3

(bloʊ)

n., v. blew, blown, blow•ing. n.
1. a display of blossoms.
2. the state of blossoming: tulips in full blow.
v.i.
3. Archaic. to blossom; flower.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English blōwan]
Translations

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.

blew

pret de blow
References in classic literature ?
The first of December was a wintry day indeed to them, for a bitter wind blew, snow fell fast, and the year seemed getting ready for its death.
With a little broken sob in her throat, Elizabeth Willard blew out the light that stood upon the table and stood weak and trembling in the darkness.
But they noticed that the air was still fresh, and that a gentle wind blew toward them.
The day was warm, and the breeze which blew from the river was very pleasant.