blind spot


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blind spot

n.
1. Anatomy The small, circular, optically insensitive region in the retina where fibers of the optic nerve emerge from the eyeball. It has no rods or cones. Also called optic disk.
2. An area that one cannot see because of an obstruction.
3. An area where radio reception is weak or nonexistent.
4. A subject about which one is markedly ignorant or prejudiced: His niece is his blind spot; in his eyes, she can do no wrong.

blind spot

n
1. (Physiology) a small oval-shaped area of the retina in which vision is not experienced. It marks the nonphotosensitive site of entrance into the eyeball of the optic nerve. See optic disc
2. a place or area, as in an auditorium or part of a road, where vision is completely or partially obscured or hearing is difficult or impossible
3. a subject about which a person is ignorant or prejudiced, or an occupation in which he or she is inefficient
4. (Broadcasting) a location within the normal range of a radio transmitter with weak reception

blind′ spot`


n.
1. a small area of the retina, where it continues to the optic nerve, that is insensitive to light.
2. an area about which one is uninformed or unappreciative.
[1860–65]

blind spot

(blīnd)
A point on the retina that is not sensitive to light. The optic nerve attaches to the retina at this point.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blind spot - a subject about which you are ignorant or prejudiced and fail to exercise good judgment; "golf is one of his blind spots and he's proud of it"
matter, topic, issue, subject - some situation or event that is thought about; "he kept drifting off the topic"; "he had been thinking about the subject for several years"; "it is a matter for the police"
2.blind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retinablind spot - the point where the optic nerve enters the retina; not sensitive to light
retina - the innermost light-sensitive membrane covering the back wall of the eyeball; it is continuous with the optic nerve
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
Translations
بُقْعَةٌ عَمْياءقَضِيَّةٌ عَمْياء مَفْهومَه
mezeranepřehledné/slepé místo
blind vinkelblindt punkthul
angle mortpoint aveugle
fehér foltvakfolt
blindur blettur, staîur sem sést ekki
nemať porozumenieneprehľadné miesto
aklın ermediği şeyanlaşılamayan şeykör nokta

blind spot

n (Anat) → punto cieco (Aut) → angolo in cui manca la visibilità (fig) → punto debole

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.

blind spot

n escotoma m (form), área de ceguera en el campo visual; (physiological) punto ciego
References in classic literature ?
There's a kind of blind spot," she said, touching her forehead, "there.
That's his third," whispered Raffles, "but it's the first I've seen distinctly, for he waited for the blind spot before the dawn.
Billy Campbell, director at Blind Spot Gear, commented on Tile Light: "No light has ever been as portable while maintaining massive light output, amazing colour rendition and all at an affordable price.
People with this blind spot are quick to judge, even though they are modeling negative behavior.
Andreas Bodemer, vice president for Bosch Automotive Aftermarket, Middle East and Africa, said: "The MMR rear means drivers are effectively looking over their shoulders all the time, because it reliably and accurately recognises other road users in their vehicle's blind spot.
Airport blind spot monitoring and control (Airport Blind Spot Monitoring and Control Zones) system acquisition.
Mercedes-Benz, a subsidiary of Daimler AG (NYSE: DAI)(FWB:DAI), has launched a radar-based system, named Mercedes-Benz Blind Spot Assist.
Home Office minister James Brokenshire insisted the Prime Minister "absolutely" does not have a blind spot when it comes to women.
Drivers had experienced many stressful situations in their cars in the last 12 months, with 54% having to carry out an emergency stop, 39% having failed to spot a car in their blind spot and 28% having been in a critical situation and not known how to act.
The name Blind Spot refers to how the society's Mac Forbes saw the potential in grapes which could have been blended into anonymity - but instead were made into terrific wines.
Not only do drivers have a natural blind-spot, the car also partially blocks the view farther to the right of the natural blind spot, where the support for the windshield and hood connect to the body of the car.
With both audible and visual signals to alert the driver to an adjacent vehicle in the blind spot area, the safety aid will be fitted as standard on GT Premium models.