blindingly


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blind

 (blīnd)
adj. blind·er, blind·est
1.
a. Sightless.
b. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
c. Of, relating to, or for sightless persons.
2.
a. Performed or made without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result: blind taste tests used in marketing studies.
b. Performed without preparation, experience, or knowledge: a blind stab at answering the question.
c. Performed by instruments and without the use of sight: blind navigation.
3. Unable or unwilling to perceive or understand: blind to a lover's faults.
4. Not based on reason or evidence; unquestioning: put blind faith in their leaders.
5. Slang Drunk.
6. Lacking reason or purpose: blind fate; blind choice.
7.
a. Difficult to comprehend or see; illegible.
b. Incompletely or illegibly addressed: blind mail.
c. Hidden from sight: a blind seam.
d. Screened from the view of oncoming motorists: a blind driveway.
e. Secret or otherwise undisclosed: a blind item in a military budget.
8. Closed at one end: a blind socket; a blind passage.
9. Having no opening: a blind wall.
10. Botany Failing to produce flowers or fruits: a blind bud.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) Blind people considered as a group. Used with the: a radio station for reading to the blind.
2. often blinds Something, such as a window shade or a Venetian blind, that hinders vision or shuts out light.
3. A shelter for concealing hunters, photographers, or observers of wildlife.
4. Something intended to conceal the true nature, especially of an activity; a subterfuge.
5. A forced bet in poker that is placed before the cards are dealt.
adv.
1.
a. Without seeing; blindly.
b. Without the aid of visual reference: flew blind through the fog.
2. Without forethought or provision; unawares: entered into the scheme blind.
3. Without significant information, especially that might affect an outcome or result: "When you read blind, you see everything but the author" (Margaret Atwood).
4. Informal Into a stupor: drank themselves blind.
5. Used as an intensive: Thieves in the bazaar robbed us blind.
tr.v. blind·ed, blind·ing, blinds
1. To deprive of sight: was blinded in an industrial accident.
2. To dazzle: skiers temporarily blinded by sunlight on snow.
3. To deprive of perception or insight: prejudice that blinded them to the proposal's merits.
4. To withhold light from: Thick shrubs blinded our downstairs windows.

[Middle English, from Old English; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blind′ing·ly adv.
blind′ly adv.
blind′ness n.
Translations

blindingly

[ˈblaɪndɪŋlɪ] ADV a blindingly obvious factun hecho de claridad meridiana
it is blindingly obvious thates a todas luces evidente que ...

blindingly

[ˈblaɪndɪŋli] adv
blindingly obvious → plus qu'évident
to be blindingly obvious → être plus qu'évident, sauter aux yeux

blindingly

adv brightblendend; it is blindingly obviousdas sieht doch ein Blinder (inf)
References in classic literature ?
Close on its apparition, and blindingly violet by contrast, danced out the first lightning of the gathering storm, and the thunder burst like a rocket overhead.
Southward they were piled in great snowy masses, so that he was half disposed to think them mountains; northward and eastward they were in wavelike levels, and blindingly sunlit.
In evening's limpid air, What time the dew's soothings Unto the earth downpour, Invisibly and unheard-- For tender shoe-gear wear The soothing dews, like all that's kind-gentle--: Bethinkst thou then, bethinkst thou, burning heart, How once thou thirstedest For heaven's kindly teardrops and dew's down-droppings, All singed and weary thirstedest, What time on yellow grass-pathways Wicked, occidental sunny glances Through sombre trees about thee sported, Blindingly sunny glow-glances, gladly-hurting?
It should have been blindingly obvious to anybody - anyone but a British holidaymaker, that is.
Dear Editor, Am I alone in vainly scouring your columns for a politician of whatever party (or none) to state the one blindingly obvious objection to reviving the Super Prix, which is that the best it can achieve is to perpetuate the Clarkson-style mentality that burning rubber - and thereby maximising greenhouse emissions - is not only an acceptable, but also a highly desirable, thing to do?
It's blindingly obvious to them that despite what post office bosses say, the service will get poorer and the queues longer when the replacement post office is set up in WH Smith.
MAY I be the first to subject you to a blindingly obvious festive travel warning?
I know the margin of victory in 1997 was small, but plot those figures on a graph and there is a blindingly obvious long-term trend: in favour of the Welsh people having more say over their own affairs.
Take Stan James's 10-11 for the tidy Aussie and go for the blindingly obvious in tonight's threeballs by taking the odds-against defending champion PAUL CASEY against Jaidee and Lian-Wei Zhang, who has a putting stroke which has seen better days.
Like the mimeographed magazines and diaristic, offhand, funny, blindingly stylish, word-crunching poems of the downtown poets, his witty sparks of art seemed a sidebar to the short menu of "big statement" styles available to the era: Abstract Expressionist, Pop, Conceptual, Minimal.
But she tells her lies in such a way that the truth becomes blindingly clear.
It's blindingly fast coming through the Internet, and the Web is as fast as other applications.