blindly


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Related to blindly: Self-abhorrence, unequivocally, contemp

blind

 (blīnd)
adj. blind·er, blind·est
1.
a. Sightless.
b. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
c. Of, relating to, or for sightless persons.
2.
a. Performed or made without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result: blind taste tests used in marketing studies.
b. Performed without preparation, experience, or knowledge: a blind stab at answering the question.
c. Performed by instruments and without the use of sight: blind navigation.
3. Unable or unwilling to perceive or understand: blind to a lover's faults.
4. Not based on reason or evidence; unquestioning: put blind faith in their leaders.
5. Slang Drunk.
6. Lacking reason or purpose: blind fate; blind choice.
7.
a. Difficult to comprehend or see; illegible.
b. Incompletely or illegibly addressed: blind mail.
c. Hidden from sight: a blind seam.
d. Screened from the view of oncoming motorists: a blind driveway.
e. Secret or otherwise undisclosed: a blind item in a military budget.
8. Closed at one end: a blind socket; a blind passage.
9. Having no opening: a blind wall.
10. Botany Failing to produce flowers or fruits: a blind bud.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) Blind people considered as a group. Used with the: a radio station for reading to the blind.
2. often blinds Something, such as a window shade or a Venetian blind, that hinders vision or shuts out light.
3. A shelter for concealing hunters, photographers, or observers of wildlife.
4. Something intended to conceal the true nature, especially of an activity; a subterfuge.
5. A forced bet in poker that is placed before the cards are dealt.
adv.
1.
a. Without seeing; blindly.
b. Without the aid of visual reference: flew blind through the fog.
2. Without forethought or provision; unawares: entered into the scheme blind.
3. Without significant information, especially that might affect an outcome or result: "When you read blind, you see everything but the author" (Margaret Atwood).
4. Informal Into a stupor: drank themselves blind.
5. Used as an intensive: Thieves in the bazaar robbed us blind.
tr.v. blind·ed, blind·ing, blinds
1. To deprive of sight: was blinded in an industrial accident.
2. To dazzle: skiers temporarily blinded by sunlight on snow.
3. To deprive of perception or insight: prejudice that blinded them to the proposal's merits.
4. To withhold light from: Thick shrubs blinded our downstairs windows.

[Middle English, from Old English; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blind′ing·ly adv.
blind′ly adv.
blind′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.blindly - without seeing or lookingblindly - without seeing or looking; "he felt around his desk blindly"
2.blindly - without preparation or reflectionblindly - without preparation or reflection; without a rational basis; "they bought the car blindly"; "he picked a wife blindly"

blindly

adverb
2. wildly, aimlessly, madly, frantically, confusedly Panicking blindly they stumbled towards the exit.
Translations
بصورة عَمْياء
nasleposlepě
blindti blinde
a ciegas
vakon
í blindni
slepo
görmeksizinkör gibi

blindly

[ˈblaɪndlɪ] ADV
1. (= unseeingly) [grope, stumble] → a ciegas, a tientas; [shoot] → a ciegas
she stared blindly at the wallse quedó mirando obnubilada a la pared
2. (= unquestioningly) [follow, accept, obey] → ciegamente

blindly

[ˈblaɪndli] adv
[obey, trust, follow] → aveuglément
[grope, shoot] → à l'aveuglette

blindly

adv (lit, fig)blind(lings)

blindly

[ˈblaɪndlɪ] advciecamente

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.
References in classic literature ?
How she did it, she never knew, but for the next few minutes she worked as if possessed, blindly obeying Laurie, who was quite self-possessed, and lying flat, held Amy up by his arm and hockey stick till Jo dragged a rail from the fence, and together they got the child out, more frightened than hurt.
Always there was something she sought blindly, passionately, some hidden wonder in life.
It seemed to free her of a responsibility which she had blindly assumed and for which Fate had not fitted her.
They had recently seen a chosen army from that country, which, reverencing as a mother, they had blindly believed invincible--an army led by a chief who had been selected from a crowd of trained warriors, for his rare military endowments, disgracefully routed by a handful of French and Indians, and only saved from annihilation by the coolness and spirit of a Virginian boy, whose riper fame has since diffused itself, with the steady influence of moral truth, to the uttermost confines of Christendom.
Ship and boat diverged; the cold, damp night breeze blew between; a screaming gull flew overhead; the two hulls wildly rolled; we gave three heavy-hearted cheers, and blindly plunged like fate into the lone Atlantic.
But the fagged whale abated his speed, and blindly altering his course, went round the stern of the ship towing the two boats after him, so that they performed a complete circuit.
He ran like one possessed, blindly, furiously, looking neither to the right nor left.
I had hoped that her regard for me would support her under any difficulty, and for some time it did; but at last the misery of her situation, for she experienced great unkindness, overcame all her resolution, and though she had promised me that nothing--but how blindly I relate
I am not brutally selfish, blindly unjust, or fiendishly ungrateful.
He was just twenty-one: he was blindly devoted to a worthless woman; and she led him on, with merciless cunning, till it was too late to draw back.
The stone faces on the outer wails stared blindly at the black night for three heavy hours; for three heavy hours, the horses in the stables rattled at their racks, the dogs barked, and the owl made a noise with very little resemblance in it to the noise conventionally assigned to the owl by men-poets.
So, when we reached home, I dropped out of the chaise behind, as quickly as possible, that I might not be in their company before those solemn windows, looking blindly on me like closed eyes once bright.