blindly


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Related to blindly: Self-abhorrence, unequivocally, contemp

blind

 (blīnd)
adj. blind·er, blind·est
1.
a. Sightless.
b. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
c. Of, relating to, or for sightless persons.
2.
a. Performed or made without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result: blind taste tests used in marketing studies.
b. Performed without preparation, experience, or knowledge: a blind stab at answering the question.
c. Performed by instruments and without the use of sight: blind navigation.
3. Unable or unwilling to perceive or understand: blind to a lover's faults.
4. Not based on reason or evidence; unquestioning: put blind faith in their leaders.
5. Slang Drunk.
6. Lacking reason or purpose: blind fate; blind choice.
7.
a. Difficult to comprehend or see; illegible.
b. Incompletely or illegibly addressed: blind mail.
c. Hidden from sight: a blind seam.
d. Screened from the view of oncoming motorists: a blind driveway.
e. Secret or otherwise undisclosed: a blind item in a military budget.
8. Closed at one end: a blind socket; a blind passage.
9. Having no opening: a blind wall.
10. Botany Failing to produce flowers or fruits: a blind bud.
n.
1. (used with a pl. verb) Blind people considered as a group. Used with the: a radio station for reading to the blind.
2. often blinds Something, such as a window shade or a Venetian blind, that hinders vision or shuts out light.
3. A shelter for concealing hunters, photographers, or observers of wildlife.
4. Something intended to conceal the true nature, especially of an activity; a subterfuge.
5. A forced bet in poker that is placed before the cards are dealt.
adv.
1.
a. Without seeing; blindly.
b. Without the aid of visual reference: flew blind through the fog.
2. Without forethought or provision; unawares: entered into the scheme blind.
3. Without significant information, especially that might affect an outcome or result: "When you read blind, you see everything but the author" (Margaret Atwood).
4. Informal Into a stupor: drank themselves blind.
5. Used as an intensive: Thieves in the bazaar robbed us blind.
tr.v. blind·ed, blind·ing, blinds
1. To deprive of sight: was blinded in an industrial accident.
2. To dazzle: skiers temporarily blinded by sunlight on snow.
3. To deprive of perception or insight: prejudice that blinded them to the proposal's merits.
4. To withhold light from: Thick shrubs blinded our downstairs windows.

[Middle English, from Old English; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blind′ing·ly adv.
blind′ly adv.
blind′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.blindly - without seeing or lookingblindly - without seeing or looking; "he felt around his desk blindly"
2.blindly - without preparation or reflectionblindly - without preparation or reflection; without a rational basis; "they bought the car blindly"; "he picked a wife blindly"

blindly

adverb
2. wildly, aimlessly, madly, frantically, confusedly Panicking blindly they stumbled towards the exit.
Translations
بصورة عَمْياء
nasleposlepě
blindti blinde
a ciegas
vakon
í blindni
slepo
görmeksizinkör gibi

blindly

[ˈblaɪndlɪ] ADV
1. (= unseeingly) [grope, stumble] → a ciegas, a tientas; [shoot] → a ciegas
she stared blindly at the wallse quedó mirando obnubilada a la pared
2. (= unquestioningly) [follow, accept, obey] → ciegamente

blindly

[ˈblaɪndli] adv
[obey, trust, follow] → aveuglément
[grope, shoot] → à l'aveuglette

blindly

adv (lit, fig)blind(lings)

blindly

[ˈblaɪndlɪ] advciecamente

blind

(blaind) adjective
1. not able to see. a blind man.
2. (with to) unable to notice. She is blind to his faults.
3. hiding what is beyond. a blind corner.
4. of or for blind people. a blind school.
noun
1. (often in plural) a screen to prevent light coming through a window etc. The sunlight is too bright – pull down the blinds!
2. something intended to mislead or deceive. He did that as a blind.
verb
to make blind. He was blinded in the war.
ˈblinding adjective
1. tending to make blind. a blinding light.
2. sudden. He realized, in a blinding flash, that she was the murderer.
ˈblindly adverb
ˈblindness noun
blind alley
a situation without any way out. This is a blind alley of a job.
ˈblindfold noun
a piece of cloth etc put over the eyes to prevent someone from seeing. The kidnappers put a blindfold over the child's eyes.
verb
to put a blindfold on (some person or animal).
adjective, adverb
with the eyes covered by a cloth etc. She came blindfold into the room.
blind spot
1. any matter about which one always shows lack of understanding. She seems to have a blind spot about physics.
2. an area which is impossible or difficult to see due to an obstruction.
the blind leading the blind
one inexperienced or incompetent person telling another about something. My teaching you about politics will be a case of the blind leading the blind.
References in classic literature ?
But I kept blindly at my studies, and yet not altogether blindly, for, as I have said, the reading I did had more tendency than before, and I was beginning to see authors in their proportion to one another, and to the body of literature.
She faced the doorway of a room, shut her eyes tightly, and then, thrusting aside the heavy draperies, she advanced blindly with her right arm outstretched before her.
I had seen him risk his limbs blindly at a fox-hunt and in a cricket-field; and soon afterwards I saw him risk his life, just as blindly, in the sea at Brighton.
It was a remarkable thing--all that physical strength which had reached in Quasimodo such an extraordinary development, and which was placed by him blindly at the disposition of another.
Like the least intelligent of detectives I went on blindly over the traces of footprints which told me just no more than they could.
They must have bolted as blindly as a flock of sheep.
A new will teach I unto men: to choose that path which man hath followed blindly, and to approve of it--and no longer to slink aside from it, like the sick and perishing!
Yet mark his perfect self-contentment, and hence learn this lesson, that to be self-contented is to be vile and ignorant, and that to aspire is better than to be blindly and impotently happy.
And try letting yourself be carried away by your feelings, blindly, without reflection, without a primary cause, repelling consciousness at least for a time; hate or love, if only not to sit with your hands folded.
I never saw her, but I have heard good as well as evil respecting her; and I imagine that, though cold and haughty in her general demeanour, and even exacting in her requirements, she has strong affections for those who can reach them; and, though so blindly attached to her son, she is not without good principles, or incapable of hearing reason.
Stremov drew back, affecting to have blindly followed Karenin, and to be astounded and distressed at what had been done.
They had been selected blindly by nature, in a cruel and ignoble environment, where the prize of living was to be gained, in the main, by the cunning of cowardice, and, on occasion, by desperateness of defence when in a corner.